Implementation of the policy protocol for management of surgical and non-surgical wounds in selected public health facilities in Ghana: An analytic case study

Robert Kaba Alhassan (Lead / Corresponding author), Quarshie-Odoo Benedicta Karley, Ennin Francis Ackah, Irene Adodoaji, Zhi Ven Fong (Editor)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background
It is estimated that millions of patients are affected by healthcare associated infections (HAIs) each year. In Ghana, high prevalence of HAIs in relation to non-surgical (also called contaminated wounds) and surgical wounds (also called sterile wounds) is largely attributed to poor adherence to policy protocols for wound management by frontline clinical staff especially nurses.
Objective
Investigate the extent to which nursing staff adhere to the policy protocol for management of non-surgical and surgical wounds in selected public health facilities in Ghana.
Methodology
This is an analytic case study among nursing staff (n = 140) in three government facilities in the Volta region of Ghana. Subjective and objective performance scores of staff on adherence proxies were compared using the Wilcoxon Signed-rank test, and univariate ordered logistic regression analysis used to predict staff likelihood of adherence to policy protocols on non-surgical and surgical wound management.
Findings
Overall, staff self-rated themselves higher on subjective performance proxies relative to their objective scores (p<0.05). Staff with more years of work experience did not translate into a higher likelihood of adhering to standard protocol on wound management (Coef. = -0.49, CI = -0.93–0.05, p = 0.036). Being a senior nursing officer relative to lower nursing ranks increased staff likelihood of complying particularly with standard policy protocol for management of non-surgical wounds (Coef. 5.27, CI = 0.59 9.95, p = 0.027).
Conclusion
There is the need for accelerated in-service training for staff on standard protocols for wound management coupled with supportive supervisions. Staff adherence to standard quality care protocols should be a pre-requisite for licensing of health facilities by regulatory bodies like Health Facilities Regulatory Agency and National Health Insurance Authority.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0234874
Number of pages17
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jun 2020

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Implementation of the policy protocol for management of surgical and non-surgical wounds in selected public health facilities in Ghana: An analytic case study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this