Implications of behavioural economics for financial literacy and public policy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper summarizes and highlights different methodological approaches to behavioural economics in the context of the conventional economic wisdom and the implications of these different methodological approaches for financial literacy, related institutional change, and public policy. Conventional economics predicts no substantive improvement from improvements to financial literacy. The errors and biases approach to behavioural economics suggests limited improvements to decision making from financial education as errors and biases are largely hardwired in the brain. Government and expert intervention affecting individual choice behaviour is recommended. The evidence suggests that the bounded rationality approach to behavioural economics, with its focus on smart decision makers and the importance institutional and environment constraints on decision making, is the most promising lense through which to analyse financial decision making. From this perspective, financial decision making can be improved by providing decision makers with better quality information presented in a non-complex fashion, an institutional environment conducive to good decisions, an incentive structure that internalize externalities involved in financial decision making, and financial education that will facilitate making the best use of the information at hand within a specific decision-making environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)677-690
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Socio-Economics
Volume41
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

Keywords

  • Behavioural economics
  • Decision-making environment
  • Ecological rationality
  • Financial literacy
  • Heuristics
  • Imperfect information
  • Nudging
  • Trust

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Implications of behavioural economics for financial literacy and public policy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this