Impressionism or Expressionism: Exploring the opportunities for genuine child participation in the school community

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A recently published annual survey by the National Society for Education in Art and Design has indicated that the value of the curricular subject of art and design is gradually being eroded in primary and secondary schools in the UK (NSEAD 2016); the data for this report has been gathered from teachers. This report is one of a number of pieces of research that have been published in the last ten years focused on the value of art and design in school curriculums, drawing upon the views and opinions of adults: the views of the pupils, particularly those in primary schools, is not prevalent or consistently gathered. Based on the findings of a systematic literature review, the purpose of this paper is to examine this issue in further detail with the aim of outlining a case for creating a network system of support and collaboration between schools and the community, with children at the centre. Such a network would go some way to ensure the sustainability of art education in primary schools of the future, but also ensure that children are provided with genuine opportunities to participate in the school and the wider community.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 3 Sep 2016
EventContemporary Childhood Conference 2016: Young Citizens & Society: Fostering Civic Participation - University of Strathclyde, Glasgow
Duration: 2 Sep 20163 Sep 2016
https://www.strath.ac.uk/humanities/schoolofeducation/newsevents/contemporarychildhoodconference2016/ (Link to conference information)

Conference

ConferenceContemporary Childhood Conference 2016
CityGlasgow
Period2/09/163/09/16
Internet address

Keywords

  • children
  • participation
  • curriculum
  • community
  • art and design

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