In-vitro antibacterial and anti-encrustation performance of silver-polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite coated urinary catheters

Liyun Wang, Shuai Zhang, Robert Keatch, George Corner, Ghulam Nabi, Sarah Murdoch, Fordyce Davidson, Qi Zhao (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are among the most common hospital-acquired infections, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. A major reason for this is that urinary catheters are not yet capable of preventing CAUTIs. Aim: To develop an anti-infective urinary catheter. Methods: An efficient silver-polytetrafluoroethylene (Ag-PTFE) nanocomposite coating was deposited on whole silicone catheters, and two in-vitro bladder models were designed to test antibacterial (against Escherichia coli) and anti-encrustation (against Proteus mirabilis) performances. Each model was challenged with two different concentrations of bacterial suspension. Findings: Compared with uncoated catheters, coated catheters significantly inhibited bacterial migration and biofilm formation on the external catheter surfaces. The time to develop bacteriuria was an average of 1.8 days vs 4 days and 6 days vs 41 days when the urethral meatus was infected with 10 6 and 10 2 cells/mL, respectively. For anti-encrustation tests, the coated catheter significantly resisted encrustation, although it did not strongly inhibit the increases in bacterial density and urinary pH. The time to blockage, which was found to be independent of the initial bacterial concentration in the bladder, was extended from 36.2±1.1 h (uncoated) to 89.5±3.54 h (coated) following bacterial contamination with 10 3 cells/mL in the bladder. Moreover, the coated catheter exhibited excellent biocompatibility with L929 fibroblast cells. Conclusion: Ag-PTFE coated Foley catheters should undergo further clinical trials to determine their ability to prevent CAUTIs during catheterization.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Early online date22 Feb 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Feb 2019

Fingerprint

Nanocomposites
Urinary Catheters
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Silver
Catheters
Catheter-Related Infections
Urinary Tract Infections
Urinary Bladder
Proteus mirabilis
Bacteriuria
Silicones
Biofilms
Cross Infection
In Vitro Techniques
Catheterization
Suspensions
Fibroblasts
Clinical Trials
Escherichia coli
Morbidity

Keywords

  • Biofilm
  • Catheter-associated urinary tract infections
  • Encrustation
  • In-vitro bladder models
  • Silver-polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite coatings
  • Urinary catheter

Cite this

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title = "In-vitro antibacterial and anti-encrustation performance of silver-polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite coated urinary catheters",
abstract = "Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are among the most common hospital-acquired infections, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. A major reason for this is that urinary catheters are not yet capable of preventing CAUTIs. Aim: To develop an anti-infective urinary catheter. Methods: An efficient silver-polytetrafluoroethylene (Ag-PTFE) nanocomposite coating was deposited on whole silicone catheters, and two in-vitro bladder models were designed to test antibacterial (against Escherichia coli) and anti-encrustation (against Proteus mirabilis) performances. Each model was challenged with two different concentrations of bacterial suspension. Findings: Compared with uncoated catheters, coated catheters significantly inhibited bacterial migration and biofilm formation on the external catheter surfaces. The time to develop bacteriuria was an average of 1.8 days vs 4 days and 6 days vs 41 days when the urethral meatus was infected with 10 6 and 10 2 cells/mL, respectively. For anti-encrustation tests, the coated catheter significantly resisted encrustation, although it did not strongly inhibit the increases in bacterial density and urinary pH. The time to blockage, which was found to be independent of the initial bacterial concentration in the bladder, was extended from 36.2±1.1 h (uncoated) to 89.5±3.54 h (coated) following bacterial contamination with 10 3 cells/mL in the bladder. Moreover, the coated catheter exhibited excellent biocompatibility with L929 fibroblast cells. Conclusion: Ag-PTFE coated Foley catheters should undergo further clinical trials to determine their ability to prevent CAUTIs during catheterization.",
keywords = "Biofilm, Catheter-associated urinary tract infections, Encrustation, In-vitro bladder models, Silver-polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite coatings, Urinary catheter",
author = "Liyun Wang and Shuai Zhang and Robert Keatch and George Corner and Ghulam Nabi and Sarah Murdoch and Fordyce Davidson and Qi Zhao",
note = "This work was supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC, EP/P00301X/1).",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1016/j.jhin.2019.02.012",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Hospital Infection",
issn = "0195-6701",
publisher = "Elsevier",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - In-vitro antibacterial and anti-encrustation performance of silver-polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite coated urinary catheters

AU - Wang, Liyun

AU - Zhang, Shuai

AU - Keatch, Robert

AU - Corner, George

AU - Nabi, Ghulam

AU - Murdoch, Sarah

AU - Davidson, Fordyce

AU - Zhao, Qi

N1 - This work was supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC, EP/P00301X/1).

PY - 2019/2/22

Y1 - 2019/2/22

N2 - Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are among the most common hospital-acquired infections, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. A major reason for this is that urinary catheters are not yet capable of preventing CAUTIs. Aim: To develop an anti-infective urinary catheter. Methods: An efficient silver-polytetrafluoroethylene (Ag-PTFE) nanocomposite coating was deposited on whole silicone catheters, and two in-vitro bladder models were designed to test antibacterial (against Escherichia coli) and anti-encrustation (against Proteus mirabilis) performances. Each model was challenged with two different concentrations of bacterial suspension. Findings: Compared with uncoated catheters, coated catheters significantly inhibited bacterial migration and biofilm formation on the external catheter surfaces. The time to develop bacteriuria was an average of 1.8 days vs 4 days and 6 days vs 41 days when the urethral meatus was infected with 10 6 and 10 2 cells/mL, respectively. For anti-encrustation tests, the coated catheter significantly resisted encrustation, although it did not strongly inhibit the increases in bacterial density and urinary pH. The time to blockage, which was found to be independent of the initial bacterial concentration in the bladder, was extended from 36.2±1.1 h (uncoated) to 89.5±3.54 h (coated) following bacterial contamination with 10 3 cells/mL in the bladder. Moreover, the coated catheter exhibited excellent biocompatibility with L929 fibroblast cells. Conclusion: Ag-PTFE coated Foley catheters should undergo further clinical trials to determine their ability to prevent CAUTIs during catheterization.

AB - Background: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are among the most common hospital-acquired infections, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. A major reason for this is that urinary catheters are not yet capable of preventing CAUTIs. Aim: To develop an anti-infective urinary catheter. Methods: An efficient silver-polytetrafluoroethylene (Ag-PTFE) nanocomposite coating was deposited on whole silicone catheters, and two in-vitro bladder models were designed to test antibacterial (against Escherichia coli) and anti-encrustation (against Proteus mirabilis) performances. Each model was challenged with two different concentrations of bacterial suspension. Findings: Compared with uncoated catheters, coated catheters significantly inhibited bacterial migration and biofilm formation on the external catheter surfaces. The time to develop bacteriuria was an average of 1.8 days vs 4 days and 6 days vs 41 days when the urethral meatus was infected with 10 6 and 10 2 cells/mL, respectively. For anti-encrustation tests, the coated catheter significantly resisted encrustation, although it did not strongly inhibit the increases in bacterial density and urinary pH. The time to blockage, which was found to be independent of the initial bacterial concentration in the bladder, was extended from 36.2±1.1 h (uncoated) to 89.5±3.54 h (coated) following bacterial contamination with 10 3 cells/mL in the bladder. Moreover, the coated catheter exhibited excellent biocompatibility with L929 fibroblast cells. Conclusion: Ag-PTFE coated Foley catheters should undergo further clinical trials to determine their ability to prevent CAUTIs during catheterization.

KW - Biofilm

KW - Catheter-associated urinary tract infections

KW - Encrustation

KW - In-vitro bladder models

KW - Silver-polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite coatings

KW - Urinary catheter

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U2 - 10.1016/j.jhin.2019.02.012

DO - 10.1016/j.jhin.2019.02.012

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Hospital Infection

JF - Journal of Hospital Infection

SN - 0195-6701

ER -