Increasing lay-people’s intentions to initiate CPR in out of hospital cardiac arrest: Results of a mixed-methods ‘before and after’ pilot study of a behavioural text message intervention (BICeP)

Barbara Farquharson (Lead / Corresponding author), Eileen Calveley, Gareth Clegg, Brian Williams, Pam Ramsay, Lisa MacInnes, Claire Torrens, Diane Dixon

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Abstract

Background: Prompt, effective cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) increases survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, CPR is often not provided, even by people with training. Low confidence, perceptions of risks and high emotion can prevent initiation of CPR. Behaviour-change techniques may be helpful in increasing CPR rates.

Aim: To pilot a text-message behavioural intervention designed to increase intentions to initiate CPR, explore participant responses and pilot methods for future randomised controlled trial of effectiveness.

Methods: A ‘before and after’ pilot study plus qualitative interviews was undertaken. Participants were lay-people who had undertaken CPR training in previous 2 years.

Participants were sent an intervention, comprising 35 text-messages containing 14 behaviour-change techniques, to their mobile phone over 4–6 weeks.

Primary outcome: intentions to initiate CPR assessed in response to 4 different scenarios.

Secondary outcomes: theory-based determinants of intention (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and self-efficacy) and self-rated competence.

Results: 20 participants (6 female, 14 male), aged 20–84 provided baseline data. 17 received the full suite of 35 text messages.15 provided follow-up data. Intentions to perform CPR in scenarios where CPR was indicated were high at baseline and increased (18.1 ± 3.2–19.5 ± 1.8/21) after the intervention, as did self-efficacy and self-rated competency. Self-efficacy, attitudes, perceived behavioural control and subjective norms were positively correlated with intentions. Qualitative data suggest the intervention was perceived as useful. Additional options for delivery format and pace were suggested.

Conclusions: Pilot-testing suggests a text-message intervention delivered after CPR training is acceptable and may be helpful in increasing/maintaining intentions to perform CPR.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100312
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalResuscitation Plus
Volume12
Early online date6 Oct 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Behaviour
  • Initiation
  • Lay-people
  • Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
  • Text-message

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