Internationalisation strategies for management education

W. S. Howe, G. Martin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Western business schools currently face a number of pressures to internationalise their postgraduate course provision in terms both of content and place of delivery. In doing so they are faced with decisions concerning their motivations, the broad strategies to adopt, the nature of collaborative links with host-country institutions, and a number of practical matters. The literature suggests that many of such issues have now broadly become clearly identified, and that a general “model” of postgraduate management course internationalisation may have begun to emerge. In this article a survey of the literature is followed by a case study of the internationalisation experience of a small UK university business school. It reports on the extent to which its experience supports the model and highlights other issues. The conclusion of the analysis is that an emergent strategy in this respect, not necessarily following a clear stages model, has nonetheless been largely successful.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)447-462
    Number of pages16
    JournalJournal of Management Development
    Volume17
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1998

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    Internationalization
    Business schools
    Internationalization strategy
    Management education
    Host country
    Emergent strategy
    Stage model

    Cite this

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    Internationalisation strategies for management education. / Howe, W. S.; Martin, G.

    In: Journal of Management Development, Vol. 17, No. 6, 1998, p. 447-462.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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