Intestinal helminth co-infection is an unrecognised risk factor for increased pneumococcal carriage density and invasive disease

Alice E. Law, Rebecca K. Shears, Andrea A. Lopez Rodas, Richard K. Grencis, Philip J Cooper, Daniel R. Neill, Aras Kadioglu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
24 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of death in children and burden of disease is greatest where helminth infections are also common. We investigated the impact of intestinal helminth co-infection on pneumococcal carriage; a risk factor for invasive disease. We used a mouse co-infection model and clinical data to assess the impact of co-infection on carriage density. Co-infection in mice was associated with increased pneumococcal carriage density and dissemination into lungs. Helminth-infected children also exhibited increased carriage density as compared to uninfected children. Anthelmintic treatment may be a cost-effective method of reducing pneumococcal disease burden in lower-income countries.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6984
Number of pages6
JournalScientific Reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Coinfection/epidemiology
  • Ecuador/epidemiology
  • Female
  • Helminthiasis/epidemiology
  • Humans
  • Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/epidemiology
  • Male
  • Mice
  • Pneumococcal Infections/epidemiology
  • Risk Factors
  • Streptococcus pneumoniae/isolation & purification

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