Introduction

The Rescaling of Territory and Citizenship in Europe

Jean-Thomas Arrighi (Lead / Corresponding author), Dejan Stjepanović

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This Special Issue explores the consequences of past and ongoing processes of territorial rescaling on citizenship in a theoretical and comparative perspective. In this introduction, we unpack our core concept of territorial rescaling and discuss its implications for the citizenship status and rights of those groups and individuals who reside in the contested territory or are connected to it. We show that in the context of the European multilevel federation, territorial rescaling is rather the norm than the exception, an inherent feature of ongoing processes of integration and disintegration instead of an anomaly. The rescaling of territorial borders invariably leads to the realignment of membership boundaries. The articles focus on various related issues, such as the delineation of the franchise in constitutive referendums; the democratic foundations of multilevel secession; and citizenship in ‘aspiring’ states ( e.g. Catalonia and Scotland), ‘new’ states (e.g. the Successor States of Former Yugoslavia) and ‘contested’ states (e.g. Kosovo and the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-226
Number of pages8
JournalEthnopolitics
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Mar 2019

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citizenship
secession
Kosovo
referendum
Yugoslavia
Cyprus
federation
Rescaling
Citizenship
Group
Catalonia

Cite this

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Introduction : The Rescaling of Territory and Citizenship in Europe. / Arrighi, Jean-Thomas (Lead / Corresponding author); Stjepanović, Dejan.

In: Ethnopolitics, Vol. 18, No. 3, 26.03.2019, p. 219-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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