Introduction to Genetics of Skeletal and Mineral Metabolic Diseases

Paul J. Newey, Caroline M. Gorvin, Michael P. Whyte, Rajesh V. Thakker

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingForeword/postscript

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many skeletal and mineral metabolic diseases have a genetic basis, which may be a germline single gene abnormality (i.e., a monogenic or Mendelian disorder), a somatic single gene defect (i.e., a postzygotic mosaic disorder), or involve several genetic variants (i.e., oligogenic or polygenic disorders). Genetic mutations causing Mendelian diseases usually have a large effect (i.e., penetrance), whereas oligogenic or polygenic disorders are associated with several genetic variations, each of which may have small effects with greater or smaller contributions from environmental factors (i.e., multifactorial disorders). Recognition of monogenic hereditary disorders is of clinical importance, as it may lead to relevant and timely investigations with correct treatment for the patient, and the patient's relatives. The diagnosis of monogenic skeletal disease requires an awareness of the great diversity of symptoms and signs that may be associated with the disorder and, as ever, clinical skill is required. Thus, the clinician will need to pursue a careful and systematic approach with detailed history and physical examination and appropriate laboratory evaluations that should lead to judicious use of the range of diagnostic tools available. Finally, the clinician will require an appreciation of the increasing number and complexity of molecular genetic tests available to ensure their appropriate use and interpretation. These considerations are reviewed in this chapter.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGenetics of Bone Biology and Skeletal Disease
EditorsRajesh J. Thakker, Michael P. Whyte, John Eishman, Takashi Igarashi
Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
PublisherAcademic Press
Pages1-21
Number of pages21
Edition2
ISBN (Electronic)9780128041987
ISBN (Print)9780128041826
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Oct 2017

Fingerprint

Metabolic Diseases
Minerals
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Clinical Competence
Penetrance
Signs and Symptoms
Physical Examination
Molecular Biology
History
Mutation
Genes
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Ethical
  • Genetics
  • Heterogeneity
  • Hybridization
  • Monogenic
  • Polymorphism
  • Prenatal
  • Skeletal

Cite this

Newey, P. J., Gorvin, C. M., Whyte, M. P., & Thakker, R. V. (2017). Introduction to Genetics of Skeletal and Mineral Metabolic Diseases. In R. J. Thakker, M. P. Whyte, J. Eishman, & T. Igarashi (Eds.), Genetics of Bone Biology and Skeletal Disease (2 ed., pp. 1-21). United Kingdom: Academic Press. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-804182-6.00001-0
Newey, Paul J. ; Gorvin, Caroline M. ; Whyte, Michael P. ; Thakker, Rajesh V. / Introduction to Genetics of Skeletal and Mineral Metabolic Diseases. Genetics of Bone Biology and Skeletal Disease. editor / Rajesh J. Thakker ; Michael P. Whyte ; John Eishman ; Takashi Igarashi. 2. ed. United Kingdom : Academic Press, 2017. pp. 1-21
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Newey, PJ, Gorvin, CM, Whyte, MP & Thakker, RV 2017, Introduction to Genetics of Skeletal and Mineral Metabolic Diseases. in RJ Thakker, MP Whyte, J Eishman & T Igarashi (eds), Genetics of Bone Biology and Skeletal Disease. 2 edn, Academic Press, United Kingdom, pp. 1-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-804182-6.00001-0

Introduction to Genetics of Skeletal and Mineral Metabolic Diseases. / Newey, Paul J.; Gorvin, Caroline M.; Whyte, Michael P.; Thakker, Rajesh V.

Genetics of Bone Biology and Skeletal Disease. ed. / Rajesh J. Thakker; Michael P. Whyte; John Eishman; Takashi Igarashi. 2. ed. United Kingdom : Academic Press, 2017. p. 1-21.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingForeword/postscript

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Newey PJ, Gorvin CM, Whyte MP, Thakker RV. Introduction to Genetics of Skeletal and Mineral Metabolic Diseases. In Thakker RJ, Whyte MP, Eishman J, Igarashi T, editors, Genetics of Bone Biology and Skeletal Disease. 2 ed. United Kingdom: Academic Press. 2017. p. 1-21 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-804182-6.00001-0