Is heading the ball in football a cause of neuropsychological impairment in amateur adult players?

Richard Stephens, Andrew Rutherford, Douglas Potter

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

    Abstract

    It is unclear whether the cumulative burden of head trauma from repeatedly heading the ball causes any neuropsychological effect in the amateur footballer. Cognitive function was measured in 30 male amateur university football players and two referent groups of male university players of contact and non-contact sports. Neuropsychological tests of episodic memory, attention, working memory and mental agility, selected on the basis of sensitivity to mild head injury and to allow comparison with previous work, were applied. Combining typical ball heading frequency per match (assessed by observation and corroborative self report) and estimates of the amount of organised soccer played (assessed by self report) provided a cumulative football heading exposure index for each football player. Preliminary results of analyses to assess any neuropsychological consequences of football participation and any relationship between the cumulative burden of football heading and neuropsychological effect will be presented.
    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 7 Sep 2000
    EventBPS Cognitive Psychology Section Annual Conference - Essex, United Kingdom
    Duration: 6 Sep 20008 Sep 2000

    Conference

    ConferenceBPS Cognitive Psychology Section Annual Conference
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityEssex
    Period6/09/008/09/00

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  • Activities

    • 1 Participation in conference

    BPS Cognitive Psychology Section Annual Conference

    Douglas David Potter (Participant)

    7 Sep 2000

    Activity: Participating in or organising an event typesParticipation in conference

    Cite this

    Stephens, R., Rutherford, A., & Potter, D. (2000). Is heading the ball in football a cause of neuropsychological impairment in amateur adult players?. Paper presented at BPS Cognitive Psychology Section Annual Conference, Essex, United Kingdom. http://privatewww.essex.ac.uk/~gdward/Essex2000_timetable.html