Is there equity of service delivery and intermediate outcomes in South Asians with type 2 diabetes? Analysis of DARTS database and summary of UK publications

C. M. Fischbacher, R. Bhopal, M. Steiner, Andrew Morris, J. Chalmers

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    45 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    There are doubts whether diabetes care is equitable across UK ethnic groups. We examined processes and outcomes in South Asians with diabetes and reviewed the UK literature.

    We used name search methods to identify South Asians in a regional diabetes database. We compared prevalence rates, processes and outcomes of care between November 2003 and December 2004. We used standard literature search techniques.

    The prevalence of diabetes in South Asians was 3-4 times higher than non-South Asians. South Asians were 1.11 times (95% confidence interval 1.06, 1.16) more likely to have a structured review. South Asian women were 1.10 times more likely to have a record of body mass index (95% CI 1.04, 1.16). HbA1c levels were 1.03 times higher (95% CI 1.00, 1.06) among South Asians, retinopathy 1.36 times more common (95% CI 1.03, 1.78) and hypertension 0.71 times as common (95% CI 0.58, 0.87).

    We found evidence of equity in many aspects of diabetes care for South Asians in Tayside. The finding of higher HbA1c and more retinopathy among South Asians needs explanation and a service response. These findings from a region with a small non-White population largely support the recent findings from other parts of the UK.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)239-249
    Number of pages11
    JournalJournal of Public Health
    Volume31
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009

    Keywords

    • ethnic groups
    • outcome measures
    • quality of service
    • Scotland
    • South Asian
    • Tayside
    • type 2 diabetes mellitus
    • CARDIOVASCULAR RISK-FACTORS
    • EUROPEAN PATIENTS
    • ETHNIC-DIFFERENCES
    • PRIMARY-CARE
    • COMPLICATIONS
    • POPULATIONS
    • MANAGEMENT
    • QUALITY
    • ENGLAND
    • OBESITY

    Cite this