Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of French medical students about antibiotic prescribing and resistance

O.J. Dyar, P. Howard, D. Nathwani, C. Pulcini

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    23 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objectives: We had for aim to learn about medical students' knowledge and perspectives on antibiotic prescribing and bacterial resistance. Methods: Penultimate and final year students at a French medical school were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey in summer 2012. Results: The response rate was 20% (60/297). Penultimate and final year students gave similar answers. Students felt more confident in diagnosing an infection, and less confident in choosing the correct dose and interval of antibiotic administration. Seventy-nine percent of students wanted more training on antibiotic treatments. Sixty-nine percent of students knew that antibiotic prescriptions were inappropriate or unnecessary in 21-60% of the cases, and 95% believed that these prescriptions were unethical. Only 27% knew that more than 80% of antibiotic prescriptions were made in community practice. Students believed that the most important causes of resistance were that too many prescriptions were made and broad-spectrum antibiotic use; 27% believed poor hand hygiene was "not at all important". Ninety-four percent believed resistance was a national problem, and 69% mentioned it as a problem in their hospital. Sixty-three percent thought that the antibiotics they would prescribe would contribute to resistance, and 96% thought resistance would be a greater problem in the future. Twenty-two percent knew MRSA bacteremia rates had decreased over the past decade in France. Conclusions: Medical students are aware that antibiotic resistance is a current and growing problem. They would like more training on antibiotic selection.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)423-430
    Number of pages8
    JournalMedecine et Maladies Infectieuses
    Volume43
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    Microbial Drug Resistance
    Medical Students
    Anti-Bacterial Agents
    Students
    Prescriptions
    Inappropriate Prescribing
    Bacterial Drug Resistance
    Hand Hygiene
    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
    Bacteremia
    Medical Schools
    France
    Infection

    Cite this

    Dyar, O.J. ; Howard, P. ; Nathwani, D. ; Pulcini, C. / Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of French medical students about antibiotic prescribing and resistance. In: Medecine et Maladies Infectieuses. 2013 ; Vol. 43, No. 10. pp. 423-430.
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    abstract = "Objectives: We had for aim to learn about medical students' knowledge and perspectives on antibiotic prescribing and bacterial resistance. Methods: Penultimate and final year students at a French medical school were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey in summer 2012. Results: The response rate was 20{\%} (60/297). Penultimate and final year students gave similar answers. Students felt more confident in diagnosing an infection, and less confident in choosing the correct dose and interval of antibiotic administration. Seventy-nine percent of students wanted more training on antibiotic treatments. Sixty-nine percent of students knew that antibiotic prescriptions were inappropriate or unnecessary in 21-60{\%} of the cases, and 95{\%} believed that these prescriptions were unethical. Only 27{\%} knew that more than 80{\%} of antibiotic prescriptions were made in community practice. Students believed that the most important causes of resistance were that too many prescriptions were made and broad-spectrum antibiotic use; 27{\%} believed poor hand hygiene was {"}not at all important{"}. Ninety-four percent believed resistance was a national problem, and 69{\%} mentioned it as a problem in their hospital. Sixty-three percent thought that the antibiotics they would prescribe would contribute to resistance, and 96{\%} thought resistance would be a greater problem in the future. Twenty-two percent knew MRSA bacteremia rates had decreased over the past decade in France. Conclusions: Medical students are aware that antibiotic resistance is a current and growing problem. They would like more training on antibiotic selection.",
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    Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of French medical students about antibiotic prescribing and resistance. / Dyar, O.J.; Howard, P.; Nathwani, D.; Pulcini, C.

    In: Medecine et Maladies Infectieuses, Vol. 43, No. 10, 2013, p. 423-430.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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