Laboratory studies of topographic effects in rotating and/or stratified fluids

P. G. Baines, P. A. Davies

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

All significant laboratory experiments were reviewed which deal with flow past obstacles of various shapes, where these experiments are relevant to motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Only steady or nearly steady flows were considered. Theoretical studies are described where a direct comparison with experimental results is possible. The subject divides into three sections: stratified flows without rotation, rotating homogeneous flows, and rotating stratified flows. Stratified flow experiments include single and multilayer flow, and continuously stratified flow over two and three dimensional barriers. Rotating homogeneous flow experiments dealing with the interior region of the flow include steady uniform and nonuniform flow, flow over isolated obstacles, dimensional obstacles, time dependent flows; and the beta effect. Downstream effects, and experiments with spherical geometry are also considered. Rotating stratified flow experiments with steady uniform flows, flow structure, drag measurements, and nonuniform flows are described.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOrographic Effects in Planetary Flows
PublisherGlobal Atmospheric Research Programme
Pages233-299
Number of pages67
ISBN (Print)999167506X, 978-9991675060
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1980

Keywords

  • Atmospheric Models, Fluid Flow, Geophysics, Rotating Fluids, Stratified Flow, Topography, Baroclinic Waves, Boussinesq Approximation, Drag Measurement, Flow Distribution, Lee Waves, Nonuniform Flow, Taylor Instability

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    Baines, P. G., & Davies, P. A. (1980). Laboratory studies of topographic effects in rotating and/or stratified fluids. In Orographic Effects in Planetary Flows (pp. 233-299). Global Atmospheric Research Programme.