Lack of significant volumetric alteration after rapid maxillary expansion supports the use of frontal sinuses for human identification purposes

Gisela Crippa Furtado, Daniela Daufenback Pompeo, Alvaro Furtado, Luiz Renato Paranhos, Ademir Franco, Luciana Monti Lima-Rivera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The present study aimed to assess the volume of the frontal sinuses before and after rapid maxillary expansion (RME). 

Material and methods: The sample consisted of 12 subjects (8 females and 4 males) with maxillary deficiency aged between 10 and 15 years old. In order to treat the skeletal deficiency, RME was performed using Hyrax system. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans were obtained from each subject before (T1) and 120 days after (T2) the RME. A table digitizer G-Pen F350 (Genius, Taipei, Taiwan) was used to select the area of the frontal sinuses in CBCT slices. The volume of the sinuses was quantified in T1 and T2. T-test for paired samples was used to compare the differences between the volume of the frontal sinuses before and after RME 

Results: The mean volume of the frontal sinuses before and after the RME was 3.03 mm3 (ranging from 2.20 mm3 to 4.40 mm3) and 3.21 mm3 (ranging from 2.55 mm3 to 4.52 mm3), respectively. Differences in volume between T1 and T2 were not statistically significant (p >.05). The present study indicates that the frontal sinuses do not modify considerably in volume after RME. 

Conclusion: From the forensic scope, this outcome supports the usefulness of the frontal sinuses for ante-mortem and post-mortem comparisons in human identification cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-67
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Forensic Radiology and Imaging
Volume12
Early online date1 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2018

Keywords

  • Computed tomography
  • Frontal sinus
  • Human identification
  • Rapid maxillary expansion

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