Land use, sediment loads and dispersal pathways from two catchments at the southern end of Lake Tanganyika, Africa: implications for lake management

Ian Donohue, Robert W. Duck, Kenneth Irvine

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Increasing sediment loads entering the Lake Tanganyika ecosystem are hastening the need for improved understanding of the linkages between catchment characteristics and influent sediment transport and loading. Sediment loads of two catchments at the southern end of the lake were estimated for October 1998–December 1999, and catchment characteristics determined using GIS. It was found that both sediment yields and loads were higher from the catchment of the Lunzua River (19.8 t km -2 and 20,114 t, respectively) compared with that of the Kalambo (4.1 t km -2 and 12,197 t) in 1999. These differences were both attributed to the smaller size and higher road density of the Lunzua catchment, and suggest that previous recommendations regarding the positioning of underwater lake reserves fail to take into account the low sediment retention capacity of small mountainous rivers. Differences between the study rivers in the transport of suspended sediments, organic matter, and bedload sediments into the lake were also found, the latter determined by the novel application of the 'McLaren Model'.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)448-455
    Number of pages8
    JournalEnvironmental Geology
    Volume44
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

    Keywords

    • Lake Tanganyika
    • Sediment transport
    • Land use
    • Sediment yields
    • Lake management

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