Leisure, economy and colonial urbanism

Darjeeling, 1835-1930

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article posits that the hill station of Darjeeling was a unique form of colonial urbanism. It shifts historiographical interest from major urban centres in colonial India (such as Bombay or Calcutta) and instead attempts a greater understanding of smaller urban centres. In the process, it also interrogates the category of hill stations, which have been understood as exotic and scenic sites rather than as towns that were integral to the colonial economy. In arguing that hill stations, particularly Darjeeling, were not merely the scenic and healthy ‘other’ of the clamorous, dirty and diseased plains of India, it refutes suggestions that the ‘despoiling’ or overcrowding of Darjeeling was incremental to the purposes of its establishment. Instead, it suggests that Darjeeling was part of the colonial mainstream; its urbanization and inclusion into the greater colonial economy was effected from the time of its establishment. Therefore, a constant tension between its exotic and its functional elements persisted throughout
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)442-461
    Number of pages20
    JournalUrban History
    Volume40
    Issue number3
    Early online date12 Apr 2013
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2013

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    India
    economy
    overcrowding
    urbanization
    town
    inclusion
    station
    Colonies
    Economy
    Leisure
    Urbanism
    time
    plain
    Colonial India
    Inclusion
    Urbanization
    Overcrowding

    Cite this

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    abstract = "This article posits that the hill station of Darjeeling was a unique form of colonial urbanism. It shifts historiographical interest from major urban centres in colonial India (such as Bombay or Calcutta) and instead attempts a greater understanding of smaller urban centres. In the process, it also interrogates the category of hill stations, which have been understood as exotic and scenic sites rather than as towns that were integral to the colonial economy. In arguing that hill stations, particularly Darjeeling, were not merely the scenic and healthy ‘other’ of the clamorous, dirty and diseased plains of India, it refutes suggestions that the ‘despoiling’ or overcrowding of Darjeeling was incremental to the purposes of its establishment. Instead, it suggests that Darjeeling was part of the colonial mainstream; its urbanization and inclusion into the greater colonial economy was effected from the time of its establishment. Therefore, a constant tension between its exotic and its functional elements persisted throughout",
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    Leisure, economy and colonial urbanism : Darjeeling, 1835-1930. / Bhattacharya, Nandini.

    In: Urban History, Vol. 40, No. 3, 08.2013, p. 442-461.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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