Lessons from a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate computer decision support software to improve the management of asthma

C. McCowan, R. G. Neville, I. W. Ricketts, F. C. Warner, Gaylor Hoskins, G. E. Thomas

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    59 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Primary objective : To investigate whether computer decision support software used in the management of patients with asthma improves clinical outcomes. Research design : Randomized controlled trial with practices each reporting on 30 patients with asthma over a 6 month period. Methods and procedures : 447 patients were randomly selected from practice asthma registers managed by 17 general practices from throughout the UK. Intervention practices used the software during consultations with these patients throughout the study while control practices did not. Main outcomes and results : Practice consultations, acute exacerbations of asthma, hospital contacts, symptoms on assessment and medication use. A smaller proportion of patients within the intervention group initiated practice consultations for their asthma: 34 (22%) vs 111 (34%), odds ratio (OR)= 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.37-0.95); and suffered acute asthma exacerbations: 12 (8%) vs 57 (17%) , OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.21- 0.85 six months after the introduction of the computer decision support software. There were no discernable differences in reported symptoms, maintenance prescribing or use of hospital services between the two groups. Conclusion : The use of computer decision support software that implements guidelines during patient consultations may improve clinical outcomes for patients with asthma.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)191-201
    Number of pages11
    JournalInformatics for Health and Social Care
    Volume26
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2001

    Fingerprint

    Software
    Asthma
    Randomized Controlled Trials
    Referral and Consultation
    Odds Ratio
    Confidence Intervals
    Symptom Assessment
    General Practice
    Research Design
    Maintenance
    Guidelines

    Keywords

    • Decision Support Software Asthma Trial

    Cite this

    McCowan, C. ; Neville, R. G. ; Ricketts, I. W. ; Warner, F. C. ; Hoskins, Gaylor ; Thomas, G. E. / Lessons from a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate computer decision support software to improve the management of asthma. In: Informatics for Health and Social Care. 2001 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 191-201.
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    Lessons from a randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate computer decision support software to improve the management of asthma. / McCowan, C.; Neville, R. G.; Ricketts, I. W.; Warner, F. C.; Hoskins, Gaylor; Thomas, G. E.

    In: Informatics for Health and Social Care, Vol. 26, No. 3, 2001, p. 191-201.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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