Lexical guidance in sentence processing: A note on Adams, Clifton, and Mitchell (1998).

Roger P. G. van-Gompel, Martin J. Pickering

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    29 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Mitchell (1987) conducted a self-paced reading experiment that showed that people experienced difficulty reading a noun phrase when it immediately followed an intransitive verb. From this, he argued for a two-stage theory of parsing, in which verb subcategorization information is initially ignored. In response, Adams, Clifton, and Mitchell (1998) found no evidence to support this claim in an eye-tracking experiment and argued that Mitchell’s segmentation procedure distorted the parsing process. We report an eye-tracking experiment, in which materials similar to those in Adams et al., but with longer noun phrases, were used, that showed a pattern of difficulty similar to Mitchell’s findings. Hence, Mitchell’s results did not depend on the use of an artificial method of presentation. The results cast further doubt on the adequacy of constraint-based accounts of parsing.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)851-857
    Number of pages7
    JournalPsychonomic Bulletin & Review
    Volume8
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2001

    Fingerprint

    Reading
    Guidance
    Sentence Processing
    Experiment
    Parsing
    Noun Phrase
    Intransitive Verbs
    Adequacy
    Artificial
    Self-paced Reading
    Verbs
    Segmentation
    Subcategorization

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Mitchell (1987) conducted a self-paced reading experiment that showed that people experienced difficulty reading a noun phrase when it immediately followed an intransitive verb. From this, he argued for a two-stage theory of parsing, in which verb subcategorization information is initially ignored. In response, Adams, Clifton, and Mitchell (1998) found no evidence to support this claim in an eye-tracking experiment and argued that Mitchell’s segmentation procedure distorted the parsing process. We report an eye-tracking experiment, in which materials similar to those in Adams et al., but with longer noun phrases, were used, that showed a pattern of difficulty similar to Mitchell’s findings. Hence, Mitchell’s results did not depend on the use of an artificial method of presentation. The results cast further doubt on the adequacy of constraint-based accounts of parsing.",
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    Lexical guidance in sentence processing: A note on Adams, Clifton, and Mitchell (1998). / van-Gompel, Roger P. G.; Pickering, Martin J.

    In: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Vol. 8, No. 4, 12.2001, p. 851-857.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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