Lifestyle interventions are feasible in patients with colorectal cancer with potential short-term health benefits

a systematic review

Susan J. Moug (Lead / Corresponding author), Adam Bryce, Nanette Mutrie, Annie S. Anderson

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    9 Citations (Scopus)
    91 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Purpose: Lifestyle interventions have been proposed to improve cancer survivorship in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), but with treatment pathways becoming increasingly multi-modal and prolonged, opportunities for interventions may be limited. This systematic review assessed the evidence for the feasibility of performing lifestyle interventions in CRC patients and evaluated any short- and long-term health benefits.

    Methods: Using PRISMA Guidelines, selected keywords identified randomised controlled studies (RCTs) of lifestyle interventions [smoking, alcohol, physical activity (PA), diet/ excess body weight] in CRC patients. These electronic databases were searched in June 2015: Dynamed, Cochrane Database, OVID MEDLINE, OVID EMBASE, PEDro.

    Results: 14 RCTs were identified: PA RCTs (n=10) consisted mainly of telephone-prompted walking or cycling interventions of varied durations, predominately in adjuvant setting; dietary/ excess weight interventions RCTs (n=4) focused on low fat and/or high fibre diets within a multi-modal lifestyle intervention. There were no reported RCTs in smoking or alcohol cessation/ reduction. PA and/or dietary/ excess weight interventions reported variable recruitment rates, but good adherence and retention/ follow-up rates, leading to short-term improvements in dietary quality, physical, psychological and quality of life parameters. Only one study assessed long-term follow up, finding significantly improved cancer-specific survival after dietary intervention.

    Conclusions: This is the first systematic review on lifestyle interventions in patients with CRC finding these interventions to be feasible with improvements in short-term health. Future work should focus on defining the optimal type of intervention (type, duration, timing, intensity) that not only leads to improved short-term outcomes, but also assesses long-term survival.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)765-775
    Number of pages11
    JournalInternational Journal of Colorectal Disease
    Volume32
    Issue number6
    Early online date3 Apr 2017
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2017

    Fingerprint

    Insurance Benefits
    Life Style
    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Exercise
    Smoking
    Alcohols
    Databases
    Diet
    Weights and Measures
    Survival
    Telephone
    MEDLINE
    Walking
    Neoplasms
    Survival Rate
    Fats
    Body Weight
    Quality of Life
    Guidelines
    Psychology

    Keywords

    • Lifestyle interventions
    • Colorectal cancer
    • Patient outcomes

    Cite this

    @article{8d308935bc304805844d19adabe19a0e,
    title = "Lifestyle interventions are feasible in patients with colorectal cancer with potential short-term health benefits: a systematic review",
    abstract = "Purpose: Lifestyle interventions have been proposed to improve cancer survivorship in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), but with treatment pathways becoming increasingly multi-modal and prolonged, opportunities for interventions may be limited. This systematic review assessed the evidence for the feasibility of performing lifestyle interventions in CRC patients and evaluated any short- and long-term health benefits.Methods: Using PRISMA Guidelines, selected keywords identified randomised controlled studies (RCTs) of lifestyle interventions [smoking, alcohol, physical activity (PA), diet/ excess body weight] in CRC patients. These electronic databases were searched in June 2015: Dynamed, Cochrane Database, OVID MEDLINE, OVID EMBASE, PEDro.Results: 14 RCTs were identified: PA RCTs (n=10) consisted mainly of telephone-prompted walking or cycling interventions of varied durations, predominately in adjuvant setting; dietary/ excess weight interventions RCTs (n=4) focused on low fat and/or high fibre diets within a multi-modal lifestyle intervention. There were no reported RCTs in smoking or alcohol cessation/ reduction. PA and/or dietary/ excess weight interventions reported variable recruitment rates, but good adherence and retention/ follow-up rates, leading to short-term improvements in dietary quality, physical, psychological and quality of life parameters. Only one study assessed long-term follow up, finding significantly improved cancer-specific survival after dietary intervention.Conclusions: This is the first systematic review on lifestyle interventions in patients with CRC finding these interventions to be feasible with improvements in short-term health. Future work should focus on defining the optimal type of intervention (type, duration, timing, intensity) that not only leads to improved short-term outcomes, but also assesses long-term survival.",
    keywords = "Lifestyle interventions, Colorectal cancer, Patient outcomes",
    author = "Moug, {Susan J.} and Adam Bryce and Nanette Mutrie and Anderson, {Annie S.}",
    note = "Funding: none.",
    year = "2017",
    month = "6",
    doi = "10.1007/s00384-017-2797-5",
    language = "English",
    volume = "32",
    pages = "765--775",
    journal = "International Journal of Colorectal Disease",
    issn = "0179-1958",
    publisher = "Springer Verlag",
    number = "6",

    }

    Lifestyle interventions are feasible in patients with colorectal cancer with potential short-term health benefits : a systematic review. / Moug, Susan J. (Lead / Corresponding author); Bryce, Adam; Mutrie, Nanette; Anderson, Annie S.

    In: International Journal of Colorectal Disease, Vol. 32, No. 6, 06.2017, p. 765-775.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Lifestyle interventions are feasible in patients with colorectal cancer with potential short-term health benefits

    T2 - a systematic review

    AU - Moug, Susan J.

    AU - Bryce, Adam

    AU - Mutrie, Nanette

    AU - Anderson, Annie S.

    N1 - Funding: none.

    PY - 2017/6

    Y1 - 2017/6

    N2 - Purpose: Lifestyle interventions have been proposed to improve cancer survivorship in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), but with treatment pathways becoming increasingly multi-modal and prolonged, opportunities for interventions may be limited. This systematic review assessed the evidence for the feasibility of performing lifestyle interventions in CRC patients and evaluated any short- and long-term health benefits.Methods: Using PRISMA Guidelines, selected keywords identified randomised controlled studies (RCTs) of lifestyle interventions [smoking, alcohol, physical activity (PA), diet/ excess body weight] in CRC patients. These electronic databases were searched in June 2015: Dynamed, Cochrane Database, OVID MEDLINE, OVID EMBASE, PEDro.Results: 14 RCTs were identified: PA RCTs (n=10) consisted mainly of telephone-prompted walking or cycling interventions of varied durations, predominately in adjuvant setting; dietary/ excess weight interventions RCTs (n=4) focused on low fat and/or high fibre diets within a multi-modal lifestyle intervention. There were no reported RCTs in smoking or alcohol cessation/ reduction. PA and/or dietary/ excess weight interventions reported variable recruitment rates, but good adherence and retention/ follow-up rates, leading to short-term improvements in dietary quality, physical, psychological and quality of life parameters. Only one study assessed long-term follow up, finding significantly improved cancer-specific survival after dietary intervention.Conclusions: This is the first systematic review on lifestyle interventions in patients with CRC finding these interventions to be feasible with improvements in short-term health. Future work should focus on defining the optimal type of intervention (type, duration, timing, intensity) that not only leads to improved short-term outcomes, but also assesses long-term survival.

    AB - Purpose: Lifestyle interventions have been proposed to improve cancer survivorship in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), but with treatment pathways becoming increasingly multi-modal and prolonged, opportunities for interventions may be limited. This systematic review assessed the evidence for the feasibility of performing lifestyle interventions in CRC patients and evaluated any short- and long-term health benefits.Methods: Using PRISMA Guidelines, selected keywords identified randomised controlled studies (RCTs) of lifestyle interventions [smoking, alcohol, physical activity (PA), diet/ excess body weight] in CRC patients. These electronic databases were searched in June 2015: Dynamed, Cochrane Database, OVID MEDLINE, OVID EMBASE, PEDro.Results: 14 RCTs were identified: PA RCTs (n=10) consisted mainly of telephone-prompted walking or cycling interventions of varied durations, predominately in adjuvant setting; dietary/ excess weight interventions RCTs (n=4) focused on low fat and/or high fibre diets within a multi-modal lifestyle intervention. There were no reported RCTs in smoking or alcohol cessation/ reduction. PA and/or dietary/ excess weight interventions reported variable recruitment rates, but good adherence and retention/ follow-up rates, leading to short-term improvements in dietary quality, physical, psychological and quality of life parameters. Only one study assessed long-term follow up, finding significantly improved cancer-specific survival after dietary intervention.Conclusions: This is the first systematic review on lifestyle interventions in patients with CRC finding these interventions to be feasible with improvements in short-term health. Future work should focus on defining the optimal type of intervention (type, duration, timing, intensity) that not only leads to improved short-term outcomes, but also assesses long-term survival.

    KW - Lifestyle interventions

    KW - Colorectal cancer

    KW - Patient outcomes

    U2 - 10.1007/s00384-017-2797-5

    DO - 10.1007/s00384-017-2797-5

    M3 - Review article

    VL - 32

    SP - 765

    EP - 775

    JO - International Journal of Colorectal Disease

    JF - International Journal of Colorectal Disease

    SN - 0179-1958

    IS - 6

    ER -