Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Prognostic Disability Marker in Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Amjad I. Altokhis (Lead / Corresponding author), Abrar AlAmrani, Abdulmajeed Alotaibi, Anna Podlasek, Cris S. Constantinescu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

To date, there are no definite imaging predictors for long-term disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the key prognostic tool for MS, primarily at the early stage of the disease. Recent findings showed that white matter lesion (WML) counts and volumes could predict long-term disability for MS. However, the prognostic value of MRI in the early stage of the disease and its link to long-term physical disability have not been assessed systematically and quantitatively. A meta-analysis was conducted using studies from four databases to assess whether MS lesion counts and volumes at baseline MRI scans could predict long-term disability, assessed by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). Fifteen studies were eligible for the qualitative analysis and three studies for meta-analysis. T2 brain lesion counts and volumes after the disease onset were associated with disability progression after 10 years. Four or more lesions at baseline showed a highly significant association with EDSS 3 and EDSS 6, with a pooled OR of 4.10 and 4.3, respectively. The risk increased when more than 10 lesions were present. This review and meta-analysis confirmed that lesion counts and volumes could be associated with disability and might offer additional valid guidance in treatment decision making. Future work is essential to determine whether these prognostic markers have high predictive potential.

Original languageEnglish
Article number270
JournalDiagnostics
Volume12
Issue number2
Early online date21 Jan 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022

Keywords

  • Meta-analysis
  • MRI
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Prognostic markers
  • White matter lesions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

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