Mass-spring matching layers for high-frequency ultrasound transducers

a new technique using vacuum deposition

Jeremy A. Brown (Lead / Corresponding author), Srikanta Sharma, Jeff Leadbetter, Sandy Cochran, Rob Adamson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We have developed a technique of applying multiple matching layers to high-frequency (>30 MHz) imaging transducers, by using carefully controlled vacuum deposition alone. This technique uses a thin mass-spring matching layer approach that was previously described in a low-frequency (1 to 10 MHz) transducer design with epoxied layers. This mass- spring approach is more suitable to vacuum deposition in highfrequency transducers over the conventional quarter-wavelength resonant cavity approach, because thinner layers and more versatile material selection can be used, the difficulty in precisely lapping quarter-wavelength matching layers is avoided, the layers are less attenuating, and the layers can be applied to a curved surface. Two different 3-mm-diameter 45-MHz planar lithium niobate transducers and one geometrically curved 3-mm lithium niobate transducer were designed and fabricated using this matching layer approach with copper as the mass layer and parylene as the spring layer. The first planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring matching network, and the second planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring network to approximate the first layer in a dual quarter-wavelength matching layer system in addition to a conventional quarter-wavelength layer as the second matching layer. The curved lithium niobate transducer was press focused and used a similar mass-spring plus quarter-wavelength matching layer network. These transducers were then compared with identical transducers with no matching layers and the performance improvement was quantified. The bandwidth of the lithium niobate transducer with the single mass-spring layer was measured to be 46% and the insertion loss was measured to be -21.9 dB. The bandwidth and insertion loss of the lithium niobate transducer with the mass-spring network plus quarter-wavelength matching were measured to be 59% and -18.2 dB, respectively. These values were compared with the unmatched trans- ucer, which had a bandwidth of 28% and insertion loss of -34.1 dB. The bandwidth and insertion loss of the curved lithium niobate transducer with the mass-spring plus quarter-wavelength matching layer combination were measured to be 68% and -26 dB, respectively; this compared with the measured unmatched bandwidth and insertion loss of 35% and -37 dB. All experimentally measured values were in excellent agreement with theoretical Krimholtz-Leedom-Matthaei (KLM) model predictions.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1911-1921
    Number of pages11
    JournalIEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control
    Volume61
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014

    Cite this

    Brown, Jeremy A. ; Sharma, Srikanta ; Leadbetter, Jeff ; Cochran, Sandy ; Adamson, Rob. / Mass-spring matching layers for high-frequency ultrasound transducers : a new technique using vacuum deposition . In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control. 2014 ; Vol. 61, No. 11. pp. 1911-1921.
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    title = "Mass-spring matching layers for high-frequency ultrasound transducers: a new technique using vacuum deposition",
    abstract = "We have developed a technique of applying multiple matching layers to high-frequency (>30 MHz) imaging transducers, by using carefully controlled vacuum deposition alone. This technique uses a thin mass-spring matching layer approach that was previously described in a low-frequency (1 to 10 MHz) transducer design with epoxied layers. This mass- spring approach is more suitable to vacuum deposition in highfrequency transducers over the conventional quarter-wavelength resonant cavity approach, because thinner layers and more versatile material selection can be used, the difficulty in precisely lapping quarter-wavelength matching layers is avoided, the layers are less attenuating, and the layers can be applied to a curved surface. Two different 3-mm-diameter 45-MHz planar lithium niobate transducers and one geometrically curved 3-mm lithium niobate transducer were designed and fabricated using this matching layer approach with copper as the mass layer and parylene as the spring layer. The first planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring matching network, and the second planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring network to approximate the first layer in a dual quarter-wavelength matching layer system in addition to a conventional quarter-wavelength layer as the second matching layer. The curved lithium niobate transducer was press focused and used a similar mass-spring plus quarter-wavelength matching layer network. These transducers were then compared with identical transducers with no matching layers and the performance improvement was quantified. The bandwidth of the lithium niobate transducer with the single mass-spring layer was measured to be 46{\%} and the insertion loss was measured to be -21.9 dB. The bandwidth and insertion loss of the lithium niobate transducer with the mass-spring network plus quarter-wavelength matching were measured to be 59{\%} and -18.2 dB, respectively. These values were compared with the unmatched trans- ucer, which had a bandwidth of 28{\%} and insertion loss of -34.1 dB. The bandwidth and insertion loss of the curved lithium niobate transducer with the mass-spring plus quarter-wavelength matching layer combination were measured to be 68{\%} and -26 dB, respectively; this compared with the measured unmatched bandwidth and insertion loss of 35{\%} and -37 dB. All experimentally measured values were in excellent agreement with theoretical Krimholtz-Leedom-Matthaei (KLM) model predictions.",
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    Mass-spring matching layers for high-frequency ultrasound transducers : a new technique using vacuum deposition . / Brown, Jeremy A. (Lead / Corresponding author); Sharma, Srikanta; Leadbetter, Jeff; Cochran, Sandy; Adamson, Rob.

    In: IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control, Vol. 61, No. 11, 11.2014, p. 1911-1921.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Mass-spring matching layers for high-frequency ultrasound transducers

    T2 - a new technique using vacuum deposition

    AU - Brown, Jeremy A.

    AU - Sharma, Srikanta

    AU - Leadbetter, Jeff

    AU - Cochran, Sandy

    AU - Adamson, Rob

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    N2 - We have developed a technique of applying multiple matching layers to high-frequency (>30 MHz) imaging transducers, by using carefully controlled vacuum deposition alone. This technique uses a thin mass-spring matching layer approach that was previously described in a low-frequency (1 to 10 MHz) transducer design with epoxied layers. This mass- spring approach is more suitable to vacuum deposition in highfrequency transducers over the conventional quarter-wavelength resonant cavity approach, because thinner layers and more versatile material selection can be used, the difficulty in precisely lapping quarter-wavelength matching layers is avoided, the layers are less attenuating, and the layers can be applied to a curved surface. Two different 3-mm-diameter 45-MHz planar lithium niobate transducers and one geometrically curved 3-mm lithium niobate transducer were designed and fabricated using this matching layer approach with copper as the mass layer and parylene as the spring layer. The first planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring matching network, and the second planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring network to approximate the first layer in a dual quarter-wavelength matching layer system in addition to a conventional quarter-wavelength layer as the second matching layer. The curved lithium niobate transducer was press focused and used a similar mass-spring plus quarter-wavelength matching layer network. These transducers were then compared with identical transducers with no matching layers and the performance improvement was quantified. The bandwidth of the lithium niobate transducer with the single mass-spring layer was measured to be 46% and the insertion loss was measured to be -21.9 dB. The bandwidth and insertion loss of the lithium niobate transducer with the mass-spring network plus quarter-wavelength matching were measured to be 59% and -18.2 dB, respectively. These values were compared with the unmatched trans- ucer, which had a bandwidth of 28% and insertion loss of -34.1 dB. The bandwidth and insertion loss of the curved lithium niobate transducer with the mass-spring plus quarter-wavelength matching layer combination were measured to be 68% and -26 dB, respectively; this compared with the measured unmatched bandwidth and insertion loss of 35% and -37 dB. All experimentally measured values were in excellent agreement with theoretical Krimholtz-Leedom-Matthaei (KLM) model predictions.

    AB - We have developed a technique of applying multiple matching layers to high-frequency (>30 MHz) imaging transducers, by using carefully controlled vacuum deposition alone. This technique uses a thin mass-spring matching layer approach that was previously described in a low-frequency (1 to 10 MHz) transducer design with epoxied layers. This mass- spring approach is more suitable to vacuum deposition in highfrequency transducers over the conventional quarter-wavelength resonant cavity approach, because thinner layers and more versatile material selection can be used, the difficulty in precisely lapping quarter-wavelength matching layers is avoided, the layers are less attenuating, and the layers can be applied to a curved surface. Two different 3-mm-diameter 45-MHz planar lithium niobate transducers and one geometrically curved 3-mm lithium niobate transducer were designed and fabricated using this matching layer approach with copper as the mass layer and parylene as the spring layer. The first planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring matching network, and the second planar lithium niobate transducer used a single mass-spring network to approximate the first layer in a dual quarter-wavelength matching layer system in addition to a conventional quarter-wavelength layer as the second matching layer. The curved lithium niobate transducer was press focused and used a similar mass-spring plus quarter-wavelength matching layer network. These transducers were then compared with identical transducers with no matching layers and the performance improvement was quantified. The bandwidth of the lithium niobate transducer with the single mass-spring layer was measured to be 46% and the insertion loss was measured to be -21.9 dB. The bandwidth and insertion loss of the lithium niobate transducer with the mass-spring network plus quarter-wavelength matching were measured to be 59% and -18.2 dB, respectively. These values were compared with the unmatched trans- ucer, which had a bandwidth of 28% and insertion loss of -34.1 dB. The bandwidth and insertion loss of the curved lithium niobate transducer with the mass-spring plus quarter-wavelength matching layer combination were measured to be 68% and -26 dB, respectively; this compared with the measured unmatched bandwidth and insertion loss of 35% and -37 dB. All experimentally measured values were in excellent agreement with theoretical Krimholtz-Leedom-Matthaei (KLM) model predictions.

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    M3 - Article

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