Measurement of food and alcohol intake in relation to chronic liver disease

Wendy L. Wrieden, Annie S. Anderson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    It is well established that the consumption of alcohol is implicated in both the cause and progression of chronic liver disease. The quantity of drink that is consumed, the pattern of drinking and type of alcoholic beverages consumed are all possible factors in disease aetiology. The impact of specific dietary components on the cause and progression of chronic liver disease is unclear although it is known that obesity, and hence the over-consumption of energy, is a predictor of fatty liver. Work to elucidate the role of both diet and alcohol in the aetiology of liver disease is hindered by the methods currently available to measure dietary (including alcohol) intake. The validity and reliability of retrospective methods of assessing diet are limited by their reliance on memory and, for the 24 h recall, the short-time period of intake assessed and its inability to assess variability across the week. Prospective methods which measure food and drink intake at the time of consumption, and include weighed or estimated food diaries, are useful for prospective cohort studies but are expensive and have a high respondent burden. For estimation of alcohol intake retrospectively, the Cognitive Lifetime Drinking questionnaire, which prompts responses using a lifetime calendar, is a useful tool but still depends on memory. More work is required to develop valid, reliable and easily administered tools for measurement of both diet and alcohol.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)285-301
    Number of pages17
    JournalStatistical Methods in Medical Research
    Volume18
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009

    Keywords

    • LIFETIME DRINKING HISTORY
    • CORONARY HEART-DISEASE
    • ENERGY-INTAKE
    • RISK-FACTORS
    • HEPATITIS-C
    • HEPATOCELLULAR-CARCINOMA
    • METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES
    • BINGE DRINKING
    • WEIGHT STATUS
    • FATTY LIVER

    Cite this

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    abstract = "It is well established that the consumption of alcohol is implicated in both the cause and progression of chronic liver disease. The quantity of drink that is consumed, the pattern of drinking and type of alcoholic beverages consumed are all possible factors in disease aetiology. The impact of specific dietary components on the cause and progression of chronic liver disease is unclear although it is known that obesity, and hence the over-consumption of energy, is a predictor of fatty liver. Work to elucidate the role of both diet and alcohol in the aetiology of liver disease is hindered by the methods currently available to measure dietary (including alcohol) intake. The validity and reliability of retrospective methods of assessing diet are limited by their reliance on memory and, for the 24 h recall, the short-time period of intake assessed and its inability to assess variability across the week. Prospective methods which measure food and drink intake at the time of consumption, and include weighed or estimated food diaries, are useful for prospective cohort studies but are expensive and have a high respondent burden. For estimation of alcohol intake retrospectively, the Cognitive Lifetime Drinking questionnaire, which prompts responses using a lifetime calendar, is a useful tool but still depends on memory. More work is required to develop valid, reliable and easily administered tools for measurement of both diet and alcohol.",
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    Measurement of food and alcohol intake in relation to chronic liver disease. / Wrieden, Wendy L.; Anderson, Annie S.

    In: Statistical Methods in Medical Research, Vol. 18, No. 3, 06.2009, p. 285-301.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Wrieden, Wendy L.

    AU - Anderson, Annie S.

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