Messy Marketing in the 2017 New Zealand Election: The Incomplete Market Orientation of the Labour and National Parties

Jennifer Lees-Marshment (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

This chapter explores the extent to which National and Labour followed the market-oriented party model in 2017. Drawing on multiple qualitative and quantitative primary sources including interviews with senior practitioners, analysis of 170+primary sources and Vote Compass main survey and post-election data, analysis finds that Labour took the edge in overall orientation towards listening and responding to the public whilst National’s lack of responsiveness ultimately lost National control of government. Market-orientation is still important. Labour’s marketing was imperfect and failed to demonstrate delivery competence, but they tried to respond to voter concerns whilst National was dismissive of market research, focused on their strengths rather than voter concerns and relied on their record instead of focusing on future promises. National need to respect, reflect, and reform and Labour needs to deliver in government, while creating space for new product development for 2020 to maintain their market orientation and win again.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPolitical Marketing and Management in the 2017 New Zealand Election
EditorsJennifer Lees-Marshment
Place of PublicationSwitzerland
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Chapter4
Pages43-65
Number of pages23
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9783319942988
ISBN (Print)9783319942971
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Publication series

NamePalgrave Studies in Political Marketing and Management
ISSN (Print)2946-2614
ISSN (Electronic)2946-2622

Keywords

  • New Zealand
  • Political marketing
  • 2017 Election
  • Branding
  • Vote Compass

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