METRIC (MREnterography or ulTRasound in Crohn's disease): a study protocol for a multicentre, non-randomised, single-arm, prospective comparison study of magnetic resonance enterography and small bowel ultrasound compared to a reference standard in those aged 16 and over

Stuart Taylor (Lead / Corresponding author), Susan Mallett, Gauraang Bhatnagar, Stuart Bloom, Arun Gupta, Steve Halligan, John Hamlin, Ailsa Hart, Antony Higginson, Ilan Jacobs, Sara McCartney, Steve Morris, Nicola Muirhead, Charles Murray, Shonit Punwani, Manuel Rodriguez-Justo, Andrew Slater, Simon Travis, Damian Tolan, Alastair WindsorPeter Wylie, Ian Zealley

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    26 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a lifelong, relapsing and remitting inflammatory condition of the intestine. Medical imaging is crucial for diagnosis, phenotyping, activity assessment and detecting complications. Diverse small bowel imaging tests are available but a standard algorithm for deployment is lacking. Many hospitals employ tests that impart ionising radiation, of particular concern to this young patient population. Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and small bowel ultrasound (USS) are attractive options, as they do not use ionising radiation. However, their comparative diagnostic accuracy has not been compared in large head to head trials. METRIC aims to compare the diagnostic efficacy, therapeutic impact and cost effectiveness of MRE and USS in newly diagnosed and relapsing CD.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)142
    Number of pages10
    JournalBMC Gastroenterology
    Volume14
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 11 Aug 2014

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