Modified Ipswich Procedure: patient-perceived benefit and surgical outcomes in a series of ten patients

B. Staniszewski (Lead / Corresponding author), R. Green, G. Sharpe, P. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
197 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLO) causes symptoms of epiphora which can be associated with stickiness, dacryocystitis and interference with tear film causing visual blurring [1]. The annual incidence rate of NLO is 20 per 100,000, with the majority of patients being females above the age of 66 years [2]. While the aetiology is usually unknown, the site of obstruction is more commonly distal and invariably amenable to treatment by DCR surgery [3-4]. Proximal NLO at the level of the cancaliculi is less common but may still be treatable by extended DCR techniques including canalulostomy. In patients with upper system atresia, or who have acquired obstruction unresponsive to DCR techniques, a conjunctival DCR (CDCR) may be the only other option. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1396-1400
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Otolaryngology
Volume42
Issue number6
Early online date23 Apr 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Nov 2017

Keywords

  • Journal Article

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