Mother-to-child transmission of HIV and utilization of preventive services in Anambra South Senatorial Zone, Nigeria: Practice considerations for social workers

Chinyere Onalu, Prince Agwu (Lead / Corresponding author), Uzoma Okoye, Ali Agha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Low- and middle-income countries, including Nigeria, are often associated with poor health outcomes, such as the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) is a dominant driver of HIV/AIDS in these countries, necessitating the need to prevent such mode of transmission. With the availability of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMCTC) services in Anambra State, Nigeria, it becomes important to investigate the utilization of these services. This is needful given the relatively high percentage of vertical transmission in the state. To conduct this study, data were sourced using six focus group discussions involving 15 health workers and 24 HIV-positive mothers selected from three health facilities that dispense PMCTC services. Findings revealed that PMTCT services in the study area had setbacks owing to facility-based inefficiencies, low-level awareness and-coverage of the services at the grass-roots level, weak social support and cultural/religious beliefs, among others. To contain these setbacks, social workers as welfare/human rights professionals were recommended to be engaged.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Social Work
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 17 Mar 2020

Keywords

  • Health sector corruption
  • human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome
  • mother-to-child transmission
  • prevention of mother-to-child transmission
  • social work and health

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