Mps1 kinase promotes sister-kinetochore bi-orientation by a tension-dependent mechanism

Jean-Francois Maure, Etsushi Kitamura, Tomoyuki U. Tanaka

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    75 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Segregation of sister chromatids to opposite spindle poles during anaphase is dependent on the prior capture of sister kinetochores by microtubules extending from opposite spindle poles (bi-orientation). If sister kinetochores attach to microtubules from the same pole (syntelic attachment), the kinetochore-spindle pole connections must be re-oriented to be converted to proper bi-orientation [1, 2]. This re-orientation is facilitated by Aurora B kinase (IpI1 in budding yeast), which eliminates kinetochore-spindle pole connections that do not generate tension [3-6]. Mps1 is another evolutionarily conserved protein kinase, required for spindle-assembly checkpoint and, in some organisms, for duplication of microtubule-organizing centers [7]. Separately from these functions, however, Mps1 has an important role in chromosome segregation [8]. Here we show that, in budding yeast, Mps1 has a crucial role in establishing sister-kinetochore bi-orientation on the mitotic spindle. Failure in bi-orientation with inactive Mps1 is not due to a lack of kinetochore-spindle pole connections by microtubules, but due to a defect in properly orienting the connections. Mps1 promotes re-orientation of kinetochore-spindle pole connections and eliminates those that do not generate tension between sister kinetochores. We did not find evidence that IpI1 regulates Mps1 or vice versa; therefore, they play similar, but possibly independent, roles in facilitating bi-orientation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2175-2182
    Number of pages8
    JournalCurrent Biology
    Volume17
    Issue number24
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 18 Dec 2007

    Keywords

    • SPINDLE-ASSEMBLY CHECKPOINT
    • BUDDING YEAST
    • PROTEIN-KINASE
    • PRECOCIOUS SEPARATION
    • MOLECULAR-MECHANISMS
    • MITOTIC SPINDLE
    • CHROMOSOME
    • ATTACHMENT
    • REVEALS
    • MITOSIS

    Cite this

    Maure, Jean-Francois ; Kitamura, Etsushi ; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U. / Mps1 kinase promotes sister-kinetochore bi-orientation by a tension-dependent mechanism. In: Current Biology. 2007 ; Vol. 17, No. 24. pp. 2175-2182.
    @article{a9eca6e3c48e4007bf3ada85df4dfeb7,
    title = "Mps1 kinase promotes sister-kinetochore bi-orientation by a tension-dependent mechanism",
    abstract = "Segregation of sister chromatids to opposite spindle poles during anaphase is dependent on the prior capture of sister kinetochores by microtubules extending from opposite spindle poles (bi-orientation). If sister kinetochores attach to microtubules from the same pole (syntelic attachment), the kinetochore-spindle pole connections must be re-oriented to be converted to proper bi-orientation [1, 2]. This re-orientation is facilitated by Aurora B kinase (IpI1 in budding yeast), which eliminates kinetochore-spindle pole connections that do not generate tension [3-6]. Mps1 is another evolutionarily conserved protein kinase, required for spindle-assembly checkpoint and, in some organisms, for duplication of microtubule-organizing centers [7]. Separately from these functions, however, Mps1 has an important role in chromosome segregation [8]. Here we show that, in budding yeast, Mps1 has a crucial role in establishing sister-kinetochore bi-orientation on the mitotic spindle. Failure in bi-orientation with inactive Mps1 is not due to a lack of kinetochore-spindle pole connections by microtubules, but due to a defect in properly orienting the connections. Mps1 promotes re-orientation of kinetochore-spindle pole connections and eliminates those that do not generate tension between sister kinetochores. We did not find evidence that IpI1 regulates Mps1 or vice versa; therefore, they play similar, but possibly independent, roles in facilitating bi-orientation.",
    keywords = "SPINDLE-ASSEMBLY CHECKPOINT, BUDDING YEAST, PROTEIN-KINASE, PRECOCIOUS SEPARATION, MOLECULAR-MECHANISMS, MITOTIC SPINDLE, CHROMOSOME, ATTACHMENT, REVEALS, MITOSIS",
    author = "Jean-Francois Maure and Etsushi Kitamura and Tanaka, {Tomoyuki U.}",
    year = "2007",
    month = "12",
    day = "18",
    doi = "10.1016/j.cub.2007.11.032",
    language = "English",
    volume = "17",
    pages = "2175--2182",
    journal = "Current Biology",
    issn = "0960-9822",
    publisher = "Elsevier",
    number = "24",

    }

    Mps1 kinase promotes sister-kinetochore bi-orientation by a tension-dependent mechanism. / Maure, Jean-Francois; Kitamura, Etsushi; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U.

    In: Current Biology, Vol. 17, No. 24, 18.12.2007, p. 2175-2182.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Mps1 kinase promotes sister-kinetochore bi-orientation by a tension-dependent mechanism

    AU - Maure, Jean-Francois

    AU - Kitamura, Etsushi

    AU - Tanaka, Tomoyuki U.

    PY - 2007/12/18

    Y1 - 2007/12/18

    N2 - Segregation of sister chromatids to opposite spindle poles during anaphase is dependent on the prior capture of sister kinetochores by microtubules extending from opposite spindle poles (bi-orientation). If sister kinetochores attach to microtubules from the same pole (syntelic attachment), the kinetochore-spindle pole connections must be re-oriented to be converted to proper bi-orientation [1, 2]. This re-orientation is facilitated by Aurora B kinase (IpI1 in budding yeast), which eliminates kinetochore-spindle pole connections that do not generate tension [3-6]. Mps1 is another evolutionarily conserved protein kinase, required for spindle-assembly checkpoint and, in some organisms, for duplication of microtubule-organizing centers [7]. Separately from these functions, however, Mps1 has an important role in chromosome segregation [8]. Here we show that, in budding yeast, Mps1 has a crucial role in establishing sister-kinetochore bi-orientation on the mitotic spindle. Failure in bi-orientation with inactive Mps1 is not due to a lack of kinetochore-spindle pole connections by microtubules, but due to a defect in properly orienting the connections. Mps1 promotes re-orientation of kinetochore-spindle pole connections and eliminates those that do not generate tension between sister kinetochores. We did not find evidence that IpI1 regulates Mps1 or vice versa; therefore, they play similar, but possibly independent, roles in facilitating bi-orientation.

    AB - Segregation of sister chromatids to opposite spindle poles during anaphase is dependent on the prior capture of sister kinetochores by microtubules extending from opposite spindle poles (bi-orientation). If sister kinetochores attach to microtubules from the same pole (syntelic attachment), the kinetochore-spindle pole connections must be re-oriented to be converted to proper bi-orientation [1, 2]. This re-orientation is facilitated by Aurora B kinase (IpI1 in budding yeast), which eliminates kinetochore-spindle pole connections that do not generate tension [3-6]. Mps1 is another evolutionarily conserved protein kinase, required for spindle-assembly checkpoint and, in some organisms, for duplication of microtubule-organizing centers [7]. Separately from these functions, however, Mps1 has an important role in chromosome segregation [8]. Here we show that, in budding yeast, Mps1 has a crucial role in establishing sister-kinetochore bi-orientation on the mitotic spindle. Failure in bi-orientation with inactive Mps1 is not due to a lack of kinetochore-spindle pole connections by microtubules, but due to a defect in properly orienting the connections. Mps1 promotes re-orientation of kinetochore-spindle pole connections and eliminates those that do not generate tension between sister kinetochores. We did not find evidence that IpI1 regulates Mps1 or vice versa; therefore, they play similar, but possibly independent, roles in facilitating bi-orientation.

    KW - SPINDLE-ASSEMBLY CHECKPOINT

    KW - BUDDING YEAST

    KW - PROTEIN-KINASE

    KW - PRECOCIOUS SEPARATION

    KW - MOLECULAR-MECHANISMS

    KW - MITOTIC SPINDLE

    KW - CHROMOSOME

    KW - ATTACHMENT

    KW - REVEALS

    KW - MITOSIS

    U2 - 10.1016/j.cub.2007.11.032

    DO - 10.1016/j.cub.2007.11.032

    M3 - Article

    VL - 17

    SP - 2175

    EP - 2182

    JO - Current Biology

    JF - Current Biology

    SN - 0960-9822

    IS - 24

    ER -