Name dominance in spoken word recognition is (not) modulated by expectations: evidence from synonyms

Andrea Weber, Alissa Melinger

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

    Abstract

    Two German eye-tracking experiments tested whether top-down expectations interact with acoustically-driven word-recognition processes. Competitor objects with two synonymous names were paired with target objects whose names shared word onsets with either the dominant or the non-dominant name of the competitor. Non-dominant names of competitor objects were either introduced before the test session or not. Eye-movements were monitored while participants heard instructions to click on target objects. Results demonstrate dominant and non-dominant competitor names were considered for recognition, regardless of top-down expectations, though dominant names were always activated more strongly.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages225-228
    Number of pages4
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2008
    Event2nd ISCA Tutorial and Research Workshop on Experimental Linguistics, ExLing 2008 - Athens, Greece
    Duration: 25 Aug 200827 Aug 2008

    Conference

    Conference2nd ISCA Tutorial and Research Workshop on Experimental Linguistics, ExLing 2008
    Country/TerritoryGreece
    CityAthens
    Period25/08/0827/08/08

    Keywords

    • eye tracking
    • pre-exposure
    • spoken-word recognition
    • synonyms

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