Negotiating the modern cross-class ‘model home’: domestic experiences in Basil Spence’s Claremont Court

Sandra Costa Santos, Nadia Bertolino

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Abstract

This article investigates the spatial articulation of architecture and home through the exploration of current domestic experiences in Basil Spence’s Claremont Court housing scheme (1959-1962), Edinburgh. How architecture and home are both idealized and lived is the backdrop for a discussion that draws on the concept of “model home,” or physical representation of a domestic ideal. The article reads Claremont Court as an architectural prototype of the modern domestic ideal, before exploring its reception by five of its households through the use of visual methods and semistructured interviews. Receiving the model home involves negotiating between ideal and lived homes. Building on this idea, the article contributes with a focus on the spatiality of such reception, showing how it is modulated according to the architectural affordances that the “model home” represents. The article expands on scholarship on architecture and home with empirical evidence that argues the reciprocal spatiality of home.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSpace and Culture
Early online date29 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 May 2018

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experience
housing
interview
evidence
Negotiating
court
Ideal
Reception
Spatiality
Empirical Evidence
Physical
Articulation
Visual Methods
Affordances
Edinburgh
Household
Prototype
Empirical evidence
household
method

Keywords

  • architectural affordances
  • architecture and home
  • cross-class domestic ideal
  • domestic experiences
  • modern model home

Cite this

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