Neutrophils may contribute to the morbidity and mortality of claudicants.

P Hickman, Peter T. McCollum, J. J. F. Belch

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    35 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease is a common cause of morbidity in middle-aged men; 5 per cent of those aged over 50 years suffer from intermittent claudication. While claudication itself is not fatal, claudicants have a mortality rate approximately three times that of non-claudicating men of the same age, mainly from cardiovascular disease. This review examines the evidence for involvement of the neutrophil in this increased mortality and describes the possible pathogenesis. It also discusses how treatment of claudication may modify neutrophil behaviour, reducing subsequent mortality and morbidity rates.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)790-798
    Number of pages9
    JournalBritish Journal of Surgery
    Volume81
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 1994

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    Neutrophils
    Morbidity
    Mortality
    Intermittent Claudication
    Arterial Occlusive Diseases
    Peripheral Arterial Disease
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Therapeutics

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Peripheral arterial occlusive disease is a common cause of morbidity in middle-aged men; 5 per cent of those aged over 50 years suffer from intermittent claudication. While claudication itself is not fatal, claudicants have a mortality rate approximately three times that of non-claudicating men of the same age, mainly from cardiovascular disease. This review examines the evidence for involvement of the neutrophil in this increased mortality and describes the possible pathogenesis. It also discusses how treatment of claudication may modify neutrophil behaviour, reducing subsequent mortality and morbidity rates.",
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    Neutrophils may contribute to the morbidity and mortality of claudicants. / Hickman, P; McCollum, Peter T.; Belch, J. J. F.

    In: British Journal of Surgery, Vol. 81, No. 6, 06.1994, p. 790-798.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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