Newmark sliding block model for predicting the seismic performance of vegetated slopes

T. Liang, J. A. Knappett (Lead / Corresponding author)

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Abstract

This paper presents a simplified procedure for predicting the seismic slip of a vegetated slope. This is important for more precise estimation of the hazard associated with seismic landslip of naturally vegetated slopes, and also 6 as a design tool for determining performance improvement when planting is to be used as a protective measure. The analysis procedure consists of two main components. Firstly, Discontinuity Layout Optimisation (DLO) 8 analysis is used to determine the critical seismic slope failure mechanism and estimate the corresponding yield acceleration of a given slope. In DLO analysis, a modified rigid perfectly plastic (Mohr–Coulomb) model is employed to approximate small permanent deformations which may accrue in non-associative materials when subjected to ground motions with relatively low peak ground acceleration. The contribution of the vegetation to enhancing the yield acceleration is obtained via subtraction of the fallow slope yield acceleration. The second stage of the analysis incorporates the vegetation contribution to the slope’s yield acceleration from DLO into 14 modified limit equilibrium equations to further account for the geometric hardening of the slope under increasing soil movement. Thereby, the method can predict the permanent settlement at the crest of the slope via a slip-dependent Newmark sliding block approach. This procedure is validated against a series of centrifuge tests to be highly effective for both fallow and vegetated slopes and is subsequently used to provide further insights into the stabilising mechanisms controlling the seismic behaviour of vegetated slopes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-40
Number of pages14
JournalSoil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering
Volume101
Early online date26 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017

Fingerprint

sliding
fallow
discontinuity
soil movement
vegetation
centrifuges
Centrifuges
Hardening
Hazards
plastics
planting
Plastics
Soils
failure mechanism
slope failure
centrifuge
hardening
ground motion
plastic
hazard

Keywords

  • Analytical modelling
  • Centrifuge modelling
  • Dynamics
  • Earthquakes
  • Sand
  • Slopes
  • Vegetation
  • Ecological Engineering

Cite this

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title = "Newmark sliding block model for predicting the seismic performance of vegetated slopes",
abstract = "This paper presents a simplified procedure for predicting the seismic slip of a vegetated slope. This is important for more precise estimation of the hazard associated with seismic landslip of naturally vegetated slopes, and also 6 as a design tool for determining performance improvement when planting is to be used as a protective measure. The analysis procedure consists of two main components. Firstly, Discontinuity Layout Optimisation (DLO) 8 analysis is used to determine the critical seismic slope failure mechanism and estimate the corresponding yield acceleration of a given slope. In DLO analysis, a modified rigid perfectly plastic (Mohr–Coulomb) model is employed to approximate small permanent deformations which may accrue in non-associative materials when subjected to ground motions with relatively low peak ground acceleration. The contribution of the vegetation to enhancing the yield acceleration is obtained via subtraction of the fallow slope yield acceleration. The second stage of the analysis incorporates the vegetation contribution to the slope’s yield acceleration from DLO into 14 modified limit equilibrium equations to further account for the geometric hardening of the slope under increasing soil movement. Thereby, the method can predict the permanent settlement at the crest of the slope via a slip-dependent Newmark sliding block approach. This procedure is validated against a series of centrifuge tests to be highly effective for both fallow and vegetated slopes and is subsequently used to provide further insights into the stabilising mechanisms controlling the seismic behaviour of vegetated slopes.",
keywords = "Analytical modelling, Centrifuge modelling, Dynamics, Earthquakes, Sand, Slopes, Vegetation, Ecological Engineering",
author = "T. Liang and Knappett, {J. A.}",
note = "The authors would like to express their sincere gratitude to Mark Truswell, Colin Stark and Gary Callon at theUniversity of Dundee for their assistance in printing the model root analogues and undertaking the centrifugetest programme. The first author would like to acknowledge the financial support of the China Scholarship Council.",
year = "2017",
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language = "English",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Newmark sliding block model for predicting the seismic performance of vegetated slopes

AU - Liang, T.

AU - Knappett, J. A.

N1 - The authors would like to express their sincere gratitude to Mark Truswell, Colin Stark and Gary Callon at theUniversity of Dundee for their assistance in printing the model root analogues and undertaking the centrifugetest programme. The first author would like to acknowledge the financial support of the China Scholarship Council.

PY - 2017/10

Y1 - 2017/10

N2 - This paper presents a simplified procedure for predicting the seismic slip of a vegetated slope. This is important for more precise estimation of the hazard associated with seismic landslip of naturally vegetated slopes, and also 6 as a design tool for determining performance improvement when planting is to be used as a protective measure. The analysis procedure consists of two main components. Firstly, Discontinuity Layout Optimisation (DLO) 8 analysis is used to determine the critical seismic slope failure mechanism and estimate the corresponding yield acceleration of a given slope. In DLO analysis, a modified rigid perfectly plastic (Mohr–Coulomb) model is employed to approximate small permanent deformations which may accrue in non-associative materials when subjected to ground motions with relatively low peak ground acceleration. The contribution of the vegetation to enhancing the yield acceleration is obtained via subtraction of the fallow slope yield acceleration. The second stage of the analysis incorporates the vegetation contribution to the slope’s yield acceleration from DLO into 14 modified limit equilibrium equations to further account for the geometric hardening of the slope under increasing soil movement. Thereby, the method can predict the permanent settlement at the crest of the slope via a slip-dependent Newmark sliding block approach. This procedure is validated against a series of centrifuge tests to be highly effective for both fallow and vegetated slopes and is subsequently used to provide further insights into the stabilising mechanisms controlling the seismic behaviour of vegetated slopes.

AB - This paper presents a simplified procedure for predicting the seismic slip of a vegetated slope. This is important for more precise estimation of the hazard associated with seismic landslip of naturally vegetated slopes, and also 6 as a design tool for determining performance improvement when planting is to be used as a protective measure. The analysis procedure consists of two main components. Firstly, Discontinuity Layout Optimisation (DLO) 8 analysis is used to determine the critical seismic slope failure mechanism and estimate the corresponding yield acceleration of a given slope. In DLO analysis, a modified rigid perfectly plastic (Mohr–Coulomb) model is employed to approximate small permanent deformations which may accrue in non-associative materials when subjected to ground motions with relatively low peak ground acceleration. The contribution of the vegetation to enhancing the yield acceleration is obtained via subtraction of the fallow slope yield acceleration. The second stage of the analysis incorporates the vegetation contribution to the slope’s yield acceleration from DLO into 14 modified limit equilibrium equations to further account for the geometric hardening of the slope under increasing soil movement. Thereby, the method can predict the permanent settlement at the crest of the slope via a slip-dependent Newmark sliding block approach. This procedure is validated against a series of centrifuge tests to be highly effective for both fallow and vegetated slopes and is subsequently used to provide further insights into the stabilising mechanisms controlling the seismic behaviour of vegetated slopes.

KW - Analytical modelling

KW - Centrifuge modelling

KW - Dynamics

KW - Earthquakes

KW - Sand

KW - Slopes

KW - Vegetation

KW - Ecological Engineering

U2 - 10.1016/j.soildyn.2017.07.010

DO - 10.1016/j.soildyn.2017.07.010

M3 - Article

VL - 101

SP - 27

EP - 40

JO - Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering

JF - Soil Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering

SN - 0267-7261

ER -