Novel protein complexes containing autophagy and UPS components regulate proteasome-dependent PARK2 recruitment onto mitochondria and PARK2-PARK6 activity during mitophagy

Nur Mehpare Kocaturk, Nesibe Peker, Karin Eberhart, Yunus Akkoc, Gamze Deveci, Jorn Dengjel, Devrim Gozuacik (Lead / Corresponding author)

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Abstract

Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved eukaryotic cellular mechanism through which cytosolic fragments, misfolded/aggregated proteins and organelles are degraded and recycled. Priming of mitochondria through ubiquitylation is required for the clearance the organelle by autophagy (mitophagy). Familial Parkinson’s Disease-related proteins, including the E3-ligase PARK2 (PARKIN) and the serine/threonine kinase PARK6 (PINK1) control these ubiquitylation reactions and contribute to the regulation of mitophagy. Here we describe, novel protein complexes containing autophagy protein ATG5 and ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) components. We discovered that ATG5 interacts with PSMA7 and PARK2 upon mitochondrial stress. Results suggest that all three proteins translocate mitochondria and involve in protein complexes containing autophagy, UPS and mitophagy proteins. Interestingly, PARK2 and ATG5 recruitment onto mitochondria requires proteasome components PSMA7 and PSMB5. Strikingly, we discovered that subunit of 20 S proteasome, PSMA7, is required for the progression of PARK2-PARK6-mediated mitophagy and the proteasome activity following mitochondrial stress. Our results demonstrate direct, dynamic and functional interactions between autophagy and UPS components that contribute to the regulation of mitophagy.
Original languageEnglish
Article number947
Number of pages16
JournalCell Death and Disease
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Nov 2022

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