Nurses leading care in custody suite environments

a qualitative study from Scotland

John Hurley, Paul Linsley, Martin Elvins, Martyn Jones

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper outlines the qualitative findings of a recent multimethod study exploring the impact of nurses assuming leadership roles in delivering primary health care to detainees within police custody suites in Scotland. The full multimethod study was conducted within a framework of realistic evaluation with key findings indicating that the nurse-led model of service delivery offers positive outcomes for all key stakeholders. Findings from the qualitative component of the study showed that the quality of clinical care for detainees improved, policing concerns for detainee safety were mitigated, and forensic medical examiners were able to expand their specialist roles. Key supporting mechanisms in achieving these outcomes included generating collaborative practices, enacting clinical leadership, and providing a forensic nursint educational program to empower nurses to generate service provision and grow professional autonomy.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)45-51
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Forensic Nursing
    Volume9
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    Scotland
    child custody
    nurse
    Nurses
    Professional Autonomy
    leadership
    Coroners and Medical Examiners
    medical examiner
    Quality of Health Care
    Police
    educational program
    Primary Health Care
    police
    autonomy
    stakeholder
    health care
    Safety
    evaluation

    Cite this

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    Nurses leading care in custody suite environments : a qualitative study from Scotland. / Hurley, John; Linsley, Paul; Elvins, Martin; Jones, Martyn.

    In: Journal of Forensic Nursing, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2013, p. 45-51.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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