On the neural origin of pseudoneglect: EEG-correlates of shifts in line bisection performance with manipulation of line length

Christopher S Y Benwell, Monika Harvey (Lead / Corresponding author), Gregor Thut

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50 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Healthy participants tend to show systematic biases in spatial attention, usually to the left. However, these biases can shift rightward as a result of a number of experimental manipulations. Using electroencephalography (EEG) and a computerized line bisection task, here we investigated for the first time the neural correlates of changes in spatial attention bias induced by line-length (the so-called line-length effect). In accordance with previous studies, an overall systematic left bias (pseudoneglect) was present during long line but not during short line bisection performance. This effect of line-length on behavioral bias was associated with stronger right parieto-occipital responses to long as compared to short lines in an early time window (100-200. ms) post-stimulus onset. This early differential activation to long as compared to short lines was task-independent (present even in a non-spatial control task not requiring line bisection), suggesting that it reflects a reflexive attentional response to long lines. This was corroborated by further analyses source-localizing the line-length effect to the right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and revealing a positive correlation between the strength of this effect and the magnitude by which long lines (relative to short lines) drive a behavioral left bias across individuals. Therefore, stimulus-driven left bisection bias was associated with increased right hemispheric engagement of areas of the ventral attention network. This further substantiates that this network plays a key role in the genesis of spatial bias, and suggests that post-stimulus TPJ-activity at early information processing stages (around the latency of the N1 component) contributes to the left bias.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-380
Number of pages11
JournalNeuroImage
Volume86
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2014

Keywords

  • Attention
  • EEG
  • Event-related potentials
  • Landmark task
  • Pseudoneglect
  • Spatial bias

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