Optimal management of urinary tract infections in older people

Louise A. Beveridge, Peter G. Davey, Gabby Phillips, Marion E. T. McMurdo

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    50 Citations (Scopus)
    3640 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) occur frequently in older people. Unfortunately, UTI is commonly overdiagnosed and overtreated on the basis of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The diagnosis of a UTI in the older patient requires the presence of new urinary symptoms, with or without systemic symptoms. Urinalysis is commonly used to diagnose infection in this population, however, the evidence for its use is limited. There is overwhelming evidence that asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated. Catheter associated urinary tract infection accounts for a significant amount of hospital-associated infection. Indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided where possible and alternatives sought. The use of narrow spectrum antimicrobial agents for urinary tract infection is advocated. Local guidelines are now widely used to reflect local resistance patterns and available agents. Guidelines need to be updated to reflect changes in antimicrobial prescribing and a move from broad to narrow spectrum antimicrobials.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)173-180
    Number of pages8
    JournalClinical Interventions in Aging
    Volume6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

    Keywords

    • urinary tract infection
    • elderly
    • review
    • INSTITUTIONALIZED ELDERLY-PEOPLE
    • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
    • NURSING-HOME RESIDENTS
    • TERM-CARE FACILITIES
    • ASYMPTOMATIC BACTERIURIA
    • EMPIRICAL THERAPY
    • DISEASES SOCIETY
    • CRANBERRY JUICE
    • WOMEN
    • DIAGNOSIS

    Cite this

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    title = "Optimal management of urinary tract infections in older people",
    abstract = "Urinary tract infections (UTI) occur frequently in older people. Unfortunately, UTI is commonly overdiagnosed and overtreated on the basis of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The diagnosis of a UTI in the older patient requires the presence of new urinary symptoms, with or without systemic symptoms. Urinalysis is commonly used to diagnose infection in this population, however, the evidence for its use is limited. There is overwhelming evidence that asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated. Catheter associated urinary tract infection accounts for a significant amount of hospital-associated infection. Indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided where possible and alternatives sought. The use of narrow spectrum antimicrobial agents for urinary tract infection is advocated. Local guidelines are now widely used to reflect local resistance patterns and available agents. Guidelines need to be updated to reflect changes in antimicrobial prescribing and a move from broad to narrow spectrum antimicrobials.",
    keywords = "urinary tract infection, elderly, review, INSTITUTIONALIZED ELDERLY-PEOPLE, RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL, NURSING-HOME RESIDENTS, TERM-CARE FACILITIES, ASYMPTOMATIC BACTERIURIA, EMPIRICAL THERAPY, DISEASES SOCIETY, CRANBERRY JUICE, WOMEN, DIAGNOSIS",
    author = "Beveridge, {Louise A.} and Davey, {Peter G.} and Gabby Phillips and McMurdo, {Marion E. T.}",
    year = "2011",
    doi = "10.2147/CIA.S13423",
    language = "English",
    volume = "6",
    pages = "173--180",
    journal = "Clinical Interventions in Aging",
    issn = "1176-9092",
    publisher = "Dove Medical Press",

    }

    Optimal management of urinary tract infections in older people. / Beveridge, Louise A.; Davey, Peter G.; Phillips, Gabby; McMurdo, Marion E. T.

    In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, Vol. 6, 2011, p. 173-180.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Optimal management of urinary tract infections in older people

    AU - Beveridge, Louise A.

    AU - Davey, Peter G.

    AU - Phillips, Gabby

    AU - McMurdo, Marion E. T.

    PY - 2011

    Y1 - 2011

    N2 - Urinary tract infections (UTI) occur frequently in older people. Unfortunately, UTI is commonly overdiagnosed and overtreated on the basis of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The diagnosis of a UTI in the older patient requires the presence of new urinary symptoms, with or without systemic symptoms. Urinalysis is commonly used to diagnose infection in this population, however, the evidence for its use is limited. There is overwhelming evidence that asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated. Catheter associated urinary tract infection accounts for a significant amount of hospital-associated infection. Indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided where possible and alternatives sought. The use of narrow spectrum antimicrobial agents for urinary tract infection is advocated. Local guidelines are now widely used to reflect local resistance patterns and available agents. Guidelines need to be updated to reflect changes in antimicrobial prescribing and a move from broad to narrow spectrum antimicrobials.

    AB - Urinary tract infections (UTI) occur frequently in older people. Unfortunately, UTI is commonly overdiagnosed and overtreated on the basis of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms. The diagnosis of a UTI in the older patient requires the presence of new urinary symptoms, with or without systemic symptoms. Urinalysis is commonly used to diagnose infection in this population, however, the evidence for its use is limited. There is overwhelming evidence that asymptomatic bacteriuria should not be treated. Catheter associated urinary tract infection accounts for a significant amount of hospital-associated infection. Indwelling urinary catheters should be avoided where possible and alternatives sought. The use of narrow spectrum antimicrobial agents for urinary tract infection is advocated. Local guidelines are now widely used to reflect local resistance patterns and available agents. Guidelines need to be updated to reflect changes in antimicrobial prescribing and a move from broad to narrow spectrum antimicrobials.

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    KW - elderly

    KW - review

    KW - INSTITUTIONALIZED ELDERLY-PEOPLE

    KW - RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL

    KW - NURSING-HOME RESIDENTS

    KW - TERM-CARE FACILITIES

    KW - ASYMPTOMATIC BACTERIURIA

    KW - EMPIRICAL THERAPY

    KW - DISEASES SOCIETY

    KW - CRANBERRY JUICE

    KW - WOMEN

    KW - DIAGNOSIS

    U2 - 10.2147/CIA.S13423

    DO - 10.2147/CIA.S13423

    M3 - Review article

    VL - 6

    SP - 173

    EP - 180

    JO - Clinical Interventions in Aging

    JF - Clinical Interventions in Aging

    SN - 1176-9092

    ER -