Organic acids, siderophores, enzymes and mechanical pressure for black slate bioweathering with the basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune

Julia Kirtzel, Nico Ueberschaar, Tanja Deckert-Gaudig, Katrin Krause, Volker Deckert, Geoffrey Michael Gadd, Erika Kothe (Lead / Corresponding author)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
88 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Although many fungi are known to be able to perform bioweathering of rocks and minerals, little information is available concerning the role of basidiomycetes in this process. The wood-rotting basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune was investigated for its ability to degrade black slate, a rock rich in organic carbon. Mechanical pressure of hyphae and extracellular polymeric substances was investigated for biophysical weathering. A mixed ß1-3/ß1-6 glucan, likely schizophyllan that is well known from S. commune, could be identified on black slate surfaces. Secretion of siderophores and organic acids as biochemical weathering agents was shown. Both may contribute to biochemical weathering in addition to enzymatic functions. Previously, the exoenzyme laccase was believed to attack organic matter within the black slate, and thereby releasing metals from the rock. Here, overexpression of laccase showed enhanced dissolution of quartz phases by etching and pitting. At the same time, the formation of a new secondary mineral phase, whewellite, could be demonstrated. Hence, a more comprehensive understanding of biophysical as well as biochemical weathering by S. commune could be reached and unexpected mechanisms like quartz dissolution linked to shale degradation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1535-1546
Number of pages12
JournalEnvironmental Microbiology
Volume22
Issue number4
Early online date18 Jul 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2020

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