Palliative care education for medical students

Differences in course evolution, organisation, evaluation and funding: A survey of all UK medical schools

Steven Walker (Lead / Corresponding author), Jane Gibbins, Paul Paes, Astrid Adams, Madawa Chandratilake, Faye Gishen, Philip Lodge, Bee Wee, Stephen Barclay

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: A proportion of newly qualified doctors report feeling unprepared to manage patients with palliative care and end-of-life needs. This may be related to barriers within their institution during undergraduate training. Information is limited regarding the current organisation of palliative care teaching across UK medical schools.

    Aims: To investigate the evolution and structure of palliative care teaching at UK medical schools.

    Design: Anonymised, web-based questionnaire. Settings/participants: Results were obtained from palliative care course organisers at all 30 UK medical schools.

    Results: The palliative care course was established through active planning (13/30, 43%), ad hoc development (10, 33%) or combination of approaches (7, 23%). The place of palliative care teaching within the curriculum varied. A student-selected palliative care component was offered by 29/30 (97%). All medical schools sought student feedback. The course was reviewed in 26/30 (87%) but not in 4. Similarly, a course organiser was responsible for the palliative care programme in 26/30 but not in 4. A total of 22 respondents spent a mean of 3.9 h (median 2.5)/week in supporting/delivering palliative care education (<1-16 h). In all, 17/29 (59%) had attended a teaching course or shared duties with a colleague who had done so. Course organisers received titular recognition in 18/27 (67%; no title 9 (33%); unknown 3 (11%)). An academic department of Palliative Medicine existed in 12/30 (40%) medical schools. Funding was not universally transparent. Palliative care teaching was associated with some form of funding in 20/30 (66%).

    Conclusion: Development, organisation, course evaluation and funding for palliative care teaching at UK medical schools are variable. This may have implications for delivery of effective palliative care education for medical students.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)575-581
    Number of pages7
    JournalPalliative Medicine
    Volume31
    Issue number6
    Early online date6 Oct 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2017

    Fingerprint

    Medical Schools
    Medical Students
    Palliative Care
    Education
    Teaching
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Students
    Curriculum
    Emotions

    Keywords

    • Journal article
    • Palliative care
    • Terminal care
    • Medical education
    • Education medical undergraduate
    • Students medical
    • Data collection

    Cite this

    Walker, Steven ; Gibbins, Jane ; Paes, Paul ; Adams, Astrid ; Chandratilake, Madawa ; Gishen, Faye ; Lodge, Philip ; Wee, Bee ; Barclay, Stephen. / Palliative care education for medical students : Differences in course evolution, organisation, evaluation and funding: A survey of all UK medical schools. In: Palliative Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 31, No. 6. pp. 575-581.
    @article{d596a39ec2aa4bf884ebe27aea370b41,
    title = "Palliative care education for medical students: Differences in course evolution, organisation, evaluation and funding: A survey of all UK medical schools",
    abstract = "Background: A proportion of newly qualified doctors report feeling unprepared to manage patients with palliative care and end-of-life needs. This may be related to barriers within their institution during undergraduate training. Information is limited regarding the current organisation of palliative care teaching across UK medical schools.Aims: To investigate the evolution and structure of palliative care teaching at UK medical schools.Design: Anonymised, web-based questionnaire. Settings/participants: Results were obtained from palliative care course organisers at all 30 UK medical schools.Results: The palliative care course was established through active planning (13/30, 43{\%}), ad hoc development (10, 33{\%}) or combination of approaches (7, 23{\%}). The place of palliative care teaching within the curriculum varied. A student-selected palliative care component was offered by 29/30 (97{\%}). All medical schools sought student feedback. The course was reviewed in 26/30 (87{\%}) but not in 4. Similarly, a course organiser was responsible for the palliative care programme in 26/30 but not in 4. A total of 22 respondents spent a mean of 3.9 h (median 2.5)/week in supporting/delivering palliative care education (<1-16 h). In all, 17/29 (59{\%}) had attended a teaching course or shared duties with a colleague who had done so. Course organisers received titular recognition in 18/27 (67{\%}; no title 9 (33{\%}); unknown 3 (11{\%})). An academic department of Palliative Medicine existed in 12/30 (40{\%}) medical schools. Funding was not universally transparent. Palliative care teaching was associated with some form of funding in 20/30 (66{\%}).Conclusion: Development, organisation, course evaluation and funding for palliative care teaching at UK medical schools are variable. This may have implications for delivery of effective palliative care education for medical students.",
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    author = "Steven Walker and Jane Gibbins and Paul Paes and Astrid Adams and Madawa Chandratilake and Faye Gishen and Philip Lodge and Bee Wee and Stephen Barclay",
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    Walker, S, Gibbins, J, Paes, P, Adams, A, Chandratilake, M, Gishen, F, Lodge, P, Wee, B & Barclay, S 2017, 'Palliative care education for medical students: Differences in course evolution, organisation, evaluation and funding: A survey of all UK medical schools', Palliative Medicine, vol. 31, no. 6, pp. 575-581. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269216316671279

    Palliative care education for medical students : Differences in course evolution, organisation, evaluation and funding: A survey of all UK medical schools. / Walker, Steven (Lead / Corresponding author); Gibbins, Jane; Paes, Paul; Adams, Astrid; Chandratilake, Madawa; Gishen, Faye; Lodge, Philip; Wee, Bee; Barclay, Stephen.

    In: Palliative Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 575-581.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Palliative care education for medical students

    T2 - Differences in course evolution, organisation, evaluation and funding: A survey of all UK medical schools

    AU - Walker, Steven

    AU - Gibbins, Jane

    AU - Paes, Paul

    AU - Adams, Astrid

    AU - Chandratilake, Madawa

    AU - Gishen, Faye

    AU - Lodge, Philip

    AU - Wee, Bee

    AU - Barclay, Stephen

    PY - 2017/6/1

    Y1 - 2017/6/1

    N2 - Background: A proportion of newly qualified doctors report feeling unprepared to manage patients with palliative care and end-of-life needs. This may be related to barriers within their institution during undergraduate training. Information is limited regarding the current organisation of palliative care teaching across UK medical schools.Aims: To investigate the evolution and structure of palliative care teaching at UK medical schools.Design: Anonymised, web-based questionnaire. Settings/participants: Results were obtained from palliative care course organisers at all 30 UK medical schools.Results: The palliative care course was established through active planning (13/30, 43%), ad hoc development (10, 33%) or combination of approaches (7, 23%). The place of palliative care teaching within the curriculum varied. A student-selected palliative care component was offered by 29/30 (97%). All medical schools sought student feedback. The course was reviewed in 26/30 (87%) but not in 4. Similarly, a course organiser was responsible for the palliative care programme in 26/30 but not in 4. A total of 22 respondents spent a mean of 3.9 h (median 2.5)/week in supporting/delivering palliative care education (<1-16 h). In all, 17/29 (59%) had attended a teaching course or shared duties with a colleague who had done so. Course organisers received titular recognition in 18/27 (67%; no title 9 (33%); unknown 3 (11%)). An academic department of Palliative Medicine existed in 12/30 (40%) medical schools. Funding was not universally transparent. Palliative care teaching was associated with some form of funding in 20/30 (66%).Conclusion: Development, organisation, course evaluation and funding for palliative care teaching at UK medical schools are variable. This may have implications for delivery of effective palliative care education for medical students.

    AB - Background: A proportion of newly qualified doctors report feeling unprepared to manage patients with palliative care and end-of-life needs. This may be related to barriers within their institution during undergraduate training. Information is limited regarding the current organisation of palliative care teaching across UK medical schools.Aims: To investigate the evolution and structure of palliative care teaching at UK medical schools.Design: Anonymised, web-based questionnaire. Settings/participants: Results were obtained from palliative care course organisers at all 30 UK medical schools.Results: The palliative care course was established through active planning (13/30, 43%), ad hoc development (10, 33%) or combination of approaches (7, 23%). The place of palliative care teaching within the curriculum varied. A student-selected palliative care component was offered by 29/30 (97%). All medical schools sought student feedback. The course was reviewed in 26/30 (87%) but not in 4. Similarly, a course organiser was responsible for the palliative care programme in 26/30 but not in 4. A total of 22 respondents spent a mean of 3.9 h (median 2.5)/week in supporting/delivering palliative care education (<1-16 h). In all, 17/29 (59%) had attended a teaching course or shared duties with a colleague who had done so. Course organisers received titular recognition in 18/27 (67%; no title 9 (33%); unknown 3 (11%)). An academic department of Palliative Medicine existed in 12/30 (40%) medical schools. Funding was not universally transparent. Palliative care teaching was associated with some form of funding in 20/30 (66%).Conclusion: Development, organisation, course evaluation and funding for palliative care teaching at UK medical schools are variable. This may have implications for delivery of effective palliative care education for medical students.

    KW - Journal article

    KW - Palliative care

    KW - Terminal care

    KW - Medical education

    KW - Education medical undergraduate

    KW - Students medical

    KW - Data collection

    U2 - 10.1177/0269216316671279

    DO - 10.1177/0269216316671279

    M3 - Article

    VL - 31

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    EP - 581

    JO - Palliative Medicine

    JF - Palliative Medicine

    SN - 0269-2163

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    ER -