Palliative care: the professional and interprofessional ethical considerations at the staff-volunteer interface in the UK and India

Ros Scott, Suresh Kumar

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    This chapter will explore the ethics of volunteer involvement in two different countries and consider the challenges which can arise from the staff - volunteer interface. Volunteer management in Western cultures has ethical principles that underpin the involvement of volunteers. What happens when these are not understood by staff? What impact does it have when an individual's beliefs and values are at odds with those of others? Many healthcare organisations, whether statutory or not-for-profit, involve volunteers in the delivery of their service. Some such as palliative care may even rely heavily on this resource in providing care and support to patients and families. The governance of many voluntary sector organisations often also lies with trustees, volunteers who have ultimate responsibility for the safe and effective running of the service. Given the challenges for professionals arising from interprofessional working, what does the addition of volunteers bring to this already complex area? The authors will consider these issues mainly from a UK perspective, whilst considering tensions which arise in the community owned palliative care model in Kerala, Southern India.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationExploring the dynamics of personal, professional and interprofessional ethics
    EditorsDivya Jindal-Snape, Elizabeth S. F. Hannah
    Place of PublicationBristol
    PublisherPolicy Press
    Pages263-276
    Number of pages14
    ISBN (Electronic)9781447311447
    ISBN (Print)9781447308997
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Palliative care: the professional and interprofessional ethical considerations at the staff-volunteer interface in the UK and India'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this