Peer advocacy in a personalized landscape: The role of peer support in a context of individualized support and austerity

Andrew Power (Lead / Corresponding author), Ruth Bartlett, Edward Hall

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    22 Citations (Scopus)
    277 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Whilst personalization offers the promise of more choice and control and wider participation in the community, the reality in the United Kingdom has been hampered by local council cuts and a decline in formal services. This has left many people with intellectual disabilities feeling dislocated from collective forms of support (Needham, 2015). What fills this gap and does peer advocacy have a role to play? Drawing on a co-researched study undertaken with and by persons with intellectual disabilities, we examined what role peer advocacy can play in a context of reduced day services, austerity and individualized support. The findings reveal that peer advocacy can help people reconnect in the face of declining services, problem-solve issues and informally learn knowledge and skills needed to participate in the community. We argue that peer advocacy
    thus offers a vital role in enabling people to take up many of the opportunities afforded by personalization.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)183-193
    Number of pages11
    JournalJournal of Intellectual Disabilities
    Volume20
    Issue number2
    Early online date26 Feb 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 10 May 2016

    Keywords

    • self-advocacy
    • welfare
    • social care
    • day services
    • personalization

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