Perceiving rhythm where none exists: event-related potential (ERP) correlates of subjective accenting

Douglas D. Potter, Maggi Fenwick, Donna Abecasis, Renaud Brochard

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    43 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Previous research suggests that our past experience of rhythmic structure in music results in a tendency for Western listeners to subjectively accent equitonal isochronous sequences. We have shown in an earlier study that the occurrence of a slightly softer tone in the 8th to 11th position of such a sequence evokes a P300 event-related potential (ERP) response of different amplitudes depending on whether the tone occurs in putatively subjectively accented or unaccented sequence positions (Brochard et al., 2003). One current theory of rhythm processing postulates that subjective accenting is the result of predictive modulations of perceptual processes by the attention system. If this is the case then ERP modulations should be observed at an earlier latency than the P300 and these should be observed in ERPs to both standard and softer tones. Such effects were not observed in our previous study. This was possibly due to the use of a linked-mastoid reference which may have obscured lateralized differences. The aim of the present study was to replicate the previous auditory P300 subjective accenting findings and to investigate the possibility that these effects are preceded by ERP changes that are indicative of rhythmic modulation of perceptual processing. Previous auditory P300 findings were replicated. In addition and consistent with current theories of rhythm processing, early brain ERP differences were observed both in standard and deviant tones from the onset of the stimulus. These left lateralized differences are consistent with a rhythmic, endogenously driven, modulation of perception that influences the conscious experience of equitonal isochronous sequences.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)103-9
    Number of pages7
    JournalCortex
    Volume45
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

    Keywords

    • Acoustic Stimulation
    • Adult
    • Auditory Perception
    • Education
    • Electroencephalography
    • Event-Related Potentials, P300
    • Evoked Potentials, Auditory
    • Female
    • Humans
    • Male
    • Middle Aged
    • Music
    • Young Adult

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Perceiving rhythm where none exists: event-related potential (ERP) correlates of subjective accenting'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this