Perceptions of Home in Long-Term Care Settings: Before and After Institutional Relocation

Mineko  Wada (Lead / Corresponding author), Sarah L. Canham, Lupin Battersby, Judith Sixsmith, Ryan Woolrych, Mei Lan  Fang, Andrew Sixsmith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although moving from institutional to home-like long-term care (LTC) settings can promote and sustain the health and well-being of older adults, there has been little research examining how home is perceived by older adults when moving between care settings. A qualitative study was conducted over a two-year period during the relocation of residents and staff from an institutional LTC home to a purpose-built LTC home in Western Canada. The study explored perceptions of home amongst residents, family members, and staff. Accordingly, 210 semistructured interviews were conducted at five time-points with 35 residents, 23 family members, and 81 staff. Thematic analyses generated four superordinate themes that are suggestive of how to create and enhance a sense of home in LTC settings: 1) physical environment features; 2) privacy and personalization; 3) autonomy, choice, and flexibility; and 4) connectedness and togetherness. The findings reveal that the physical environment features are foundational for the emergence of social and personal meanings associated with a sense of home, and highlight the impact of care practices on the sense of home when the workplace becomes a home. In addition, tension that arises between providing care and creating a home-like environment in LTC settings is discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages24
JournalAgeing and Society
Early online date9 Jan 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 9 Jan 2019

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Long-Term Care
move
resident
staff
home care
family member
Privacy
Workplace
personalization
Canada
privacy
Long-term Care
Interviews
flexibility
workplace
autonomy
well-being
Health
Staff
Residents

Keywords

  • meaning of home
  • long-term care
  • semi-structured interviews
  • thematic analysis
  • institutional relocation
  • care practices

Cite this

Wada, Mineko  ; Canham, Sarah L. ; Battersby, Lupin ; Sixsmith, Judith ; Woolrych, Ryan ; Fang, Mei Lan  ; Sixsmith, Andrew. / Perceptions of Home in Long-Term Care Settings : Before and After Institutional Relocation. In: Ageing and Society. 2019.
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Perceptions of Home in Long-Term Care Settings : Before and After Institutional Relocation. / Wada, Mineko  (Lead / Corresponding author); Canham, Sarah L.; Battersby, Lupin; Sixsmith, Judith; Woolrych, Ryan; Fang, Mei Lan  ; Sixsmith, Andrew.

In: Ageing and Society, 09.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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