Performance‐related Pay in Nursing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Examines the introduction of PRP into occupations like nursing. Essentially a literature review, examines the theoretical case for and practical problems of PRP in its “natural setting” in the private sector and highlights the issues of performance measurement, motivation and control in nursing. Generally concludes that any attempt to force individualized PRP into nursing that does not recognize the contingencies of particular trusts and those who work in them is likely to prove counter‐productive. Neither the theoretical justification nor the empirical evidence supporting PRP is sufficiently strong to warrant wholesale adoption. Instead, trusts which wish to bring about a focus on a more performance‐oriented culture would be better advised to refine performance measures and consider group‐based schemes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-17
Number of pages8
JournalHealth Manpower Management
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

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Nursing
Justification
Empirical Evidence
Private Sector
Contingency
Literature Review
Warrants
Wishes
Performance Measures
Performance Measurement

Cite this

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title = "Performance‐related Pay in Nursing",
abstract = "Examines the introduction of PRP into occupations like nursing. Essentially a literature review, examines the theoretical case for and practical problems of PRP in its “natural setting” in the private sector and highlights the issues of performance measurement, motivation and control in nursing. Generally concludes that any attempt to force individualized PRP into nursing that does not recognize the contingencies of particular trusts and those who work in them is likely to prove counter‐productive. Neither the theoretical justification nor the empirical evidence supporting PRP is sufficiently strong to warrant wholesale adoption. Instead, trusts which wish to bring about a focus on a more performance‐oriented culture would be better advised to refine performance measures and consider group‐based schemes.",
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Performance‐related Pay in Nursing. / Martin, Graeme.

In: Health Manpower Management, Vol. 20, No. 5, 1994, p. 10-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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