Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta genotype influences metabolic phenotype and may Influence lipid response to statin therapy in humans: A genetics of diabetes audit and research Tayside study

Lindsay R. Burch, Louise A. Donnelly, Alex S. F. Doney, Jeffrey Brady, Anna M. Tommasi, Adrian L. Whitley, Catharine Goddard, Andrew D. Morris, Michael K. Hansen, Colin N. A. Palmer

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    20 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Context: Previous studies have identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the gene encoding peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPARD), rs2016520, that is associated with changes in metabolic disease in some but not all studies, which suggests that PPARD agonists may have therapeutic benefits for the treatment of metabolic disorders, including dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, and obesity.

    Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether rs2016520 or other single-nucleotide polymorphism in the PPARD locus influenced the risk of developing various characteristics of metabolic disease.

    Design: Haplotype tagging analysis across PPARD was performed in 11,074 individuals from the Welcome Trust U. K. Type 2 Diabetes Case Control Collection.

    Results: In subjects with and without type 2 diabetes, rs2016520 was associated with body mass index, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, leptin, and TNF alpha and was dependent on gender.

    Conclusion: The current results suggest differential effects of PPAR delta in males and females. (J Clin Endocrinol Metab 95: 1830-1837, 2010)

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1830-1837
    Number of pages8
    JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
    Volume95
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010

    Keywords

    • INDUCED INSULIN-RESISTANCE
    • PPAR-DELTA
    • SERUM LEPTIN
    • SEXUAL-DIMORPHISM
    • SKELETAL-MUSCLE
    • ADIPOSE-TISSUE
    • ADIPONECTIN
    • POLYMORPHISM
    • ASSOCIATION
    • SENSITIVITY

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