Perspectives of patients and family members regarding psychological support using intensive care diaries: an exploratory mixed methods study

Leanne M. Aitken (Lead / Corresponding author), Janice Rattray, Justin Kenardy, Alastair M. Hull, Amanda J. Ullman, Robyne Le Brocque, Marion Mitchell, Chelsea Davis, Maria I. Castillo, Bonnie Macfarlane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: Diaries summarizing intensive care are routine practice in some countries, although evidence to support diary use is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify whether distress post-intensive care influences patients' and relatives' choice as to whether they would like to receive a diary and what information delivery method is preferred.

Materials and methods: Intensive care patients admitted for at least 3 days and their relatives participated in an exploratory mixed methods study. Interviews were conducted 3 to 5 months after discharge. Psychological distress was assessed using Kessler-10 and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Checklist - 5. Perceptions of benefit of diaries were assessed using a 4-point Likert scale. Differences were examined using Fisher exact test (P<.05).

Results: Fifty-seven patients and 22 relatives consented to participation, with 22 patients and 22 relatives interviewed before data saturation. Psychological distress was evident in 25 (47%) patients and 5 (23%) relatives. Participants' psychological health was similar for those who perceived diaries as beneficial, and those who did not. Themes included memory, process, and impact, although opinions were diverse.

Conclusions: Patient and relative preferences of receiving a diary are not related to psychological distress. Diverse opinions around common themes suggest the need for a range of interventions to aid psychological recovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-268
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Critical Care
Volume38
Early online date11 Dec 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2017

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Critical Care
Psychology
Patient Preference
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Checklist
Interviews
Health

Keywords

  • Recovery
  • Posttraumatic stress
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Intensive care
  • Intensive care diaries

Cite this

Aitken, Leanne M. ; Rattray, Janice ; Kenardy, Justin ; Hull, Alastair M. ; Ullman, Amanda J. ; Le Brocque, Robyne ; Mitchell, Marion ; Davis, Chelsea ; Castillo, Maria I. ; Macfarlane, Bonnie. / Perspectives of patients and family members regarding psychological support using intensive care diaries : an exploratory mixed methods study. In: Journal of Critical Care. 2017 ; Vol. 38. pp. 263-268.
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abstract = "Purpose: Diaries summarizing intensive care are routine practice in some countries, although evidence to support diary use is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify whether distress post-intensive care influences patients' and relatives' choice as to whether they would like to receive a diary and what information delivery method is preferred.Materials and methods: Intensive care patients admitted for at least 3 days and their relatives participated in an exploratory mixed methods study. Interviews were conducted 3 to 5 months after discharge. Psychological distress was assessed using Kessler-10 and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Checklist - 5. Perceptions of benefit of diaries were assessed using a 4-point Likert scale. Differences were examined using Fisher exact test (P<.05).Results: Fifty-seven patients and 22 relatives consented to participation, with 22 patients and 22 relatives interviewed before data saturation. Psychological distress was evident in 25 (47{\%}) patients and 5 (23{\%}) relatives. Participants' psychological health was similar for those who perceived diaries as beneficial, and those who did not. Themes included memory, process, and impact, although opinions were diverse.Conclusions: Patient and relative preferences of receiving a diary are not related to psychological distress. Diverse opinions around common themes suggest the need for a range of interventions to aid psychological recovery.",
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Aitken, LM, Rattray, J, Kenardy, J, Hull, AM, Ullman, AJ, Le Brocque, R, Mitchell, M, Davis, C, Castillo, MI & Macfarlane, B 2017, 'Perspectives of patients and family members regarding psychological support using intensive care diaries: an exploratory mixed methods study', Journal of Critical Care, vol. 38, pp. 263-268. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrc.2016.12.003

Perspectives of patients and family members regarding psychological support using intensive care diaries : an exploratory mixed methods study. / Aitken, Leanne M. (Lead / Corresponding author); Rattray, Janice; Kenardy, Justin; Hull, Alastair M.; Ullman, Amanda J.; Le Brocque, Robyne; Mitchell, Marion; Davis, Chelsea; Castillo, Maria I.; Macfarlane, Bonnie.

In: Journal of Critical Care, Vol. 38, 04.2017, p. 263-268.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perspectives of patients and family members regarding psychological support using intensive care diaries

T2 - an exploratory mixed methods study

AU - Aitken, Leanne M.

AU - Rattray, Janice

AU - Kenardy, Justin

AU - Hull, Alastair M.

AU - Ullman, Amanda J.

AU - Le Brocque, Robyne

AU - Mitchell, Marion

AU - Davis, Chelsea

AU - Castillo, Maria I.

AU - Macfarlane, Bonnie

N1 - We would also like to thank the former Griffith Health Institute (Now Menzies Health Institute Queensland) and the National Health and Medical Research Council Centre for Research Excellence in Nursing at Griffith University (Brisbane) for funding the study.

PY - 2017/4

Y1 - 2017/4

N2 - Purpose: Diaries summarizing intensive care are routine practice in some countries, although evidence to support diary use is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify whether distress post-intensive care influences patients' and relatives' choice as to whether they would like to receive a diary and what information delivery method is preferred.Materials and methods: Intensive care patients admitted for at least 3 days and their relatives participated in an exploratory mixed methods study. Interviews were conducted 3 to 5 months after discharge. Psychological distress was assessed using Kessler-10 and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Checklist - 5. Perceptions of benefit of diaries were assessed using a 4-point Likert scale. Differences were examined using Fisher exact test (P<.05).Results: Fifty-seven patients and 22 relatives consented to participation, with 22 patients and 22 relatives interviewed before data saturation. Psychological distress was evident in 25 (47%) patients and 5 (23%) relatives. Participants' psychological health was similar for those who perceived diaries as beneficial, and those who did not. Themes included memory, process, and impact, although opinions were diverse.Conclusions: Patient and relative preferences of receiving a diary are not related to psychological distress. Diverse opinions around common themes suggest the need for a range of interventions to aid psychological recovery.

AB - Purpose: Diaries summarizing intensive care are routine practice in some countries, although evidence to support diary use is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify whether distress post-intensive care influences patients' and relatives' choice as to whether they would like to receive a diary and what information delivery method is preferred.Materials and methods: Intensive care patients admitted for at least 3 days and their relatives participated in an exploratory mixed methods study. Interviews were conducted 3 to 5 months after discharge. Psychological distress was assessed using Kessler-10 and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptom Checklist - 5. Perceptions of benefit of diaries were assessed using a 4-point Likert scale. Differences were examined using Fisher exact test (P<.05).Results: Fifty-seven patients and 22 relatives consented to participation, with 22 patients and 22 relatives interviewed before data saturation. Psychological distress was evident in 25 (47%) patients and 5 (23%) relatives. Participants' psychological health was similar for those who perceived diaries as beneficial, and those who did not. Themes included memory, process, and impact, although opinions were diverse.Conclusions: Patient and relative preferences of receiving a diary are not related to psychological distress. Diverse opinions around common themes suggest the need for a range of interventions to aid psychological recovery.

KW - Recovery

KW - Posttraumatic stress

KW - Anxiety

KW - Depression

KW - Intensive care

KW - Intensive care diaries

U2 - 10.1016/j.jcrc.2016.12.003

DO - 10.1016/j.jcrc.2016.12.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 28011420

VL - 38

SP - 263

EP - 268

JO - Journal of Critical Care

JF - Journal of Critical Care

SN - 0883-9441

ER -