Phylogeny and Function of the Invertebrate p53 Superfamily

Rachael Rutkowski, Kay Hofmann, Anton Gartner

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    62 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The origin of the p53 superfamily predates animal evolution and first appears in unicellular Flagellates. Invertebrate p53 superfamily members appear to have a p63-like domain structure, which seems to be evolutionarily ancient. The radiation into p53, p63, and p73 proteins is a vertebrate invention. In invertebrate models amenable to genetic analysis p53 superfamily members mainly act in apoptosis regulation in response to genotoxic agents and do not have overt developmental functions. We summarize the literature on cnidarian and mollusc p53 superfamily members and focus on the function and regulation of Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans p53 superfamily members in triggering apoptosis. Furthermore, we examine the emerging evidence showing that invertebrate p53 superfamily proteins also have functions unrelated to apoptosis, such as DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoint responses, compensatory proliferation, aging, autophagy, and innate immunity.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbera001131
    Pages (from-to)-
    Number of pages13
    JournalCold spring harbor perspectives in biology
    Volume2
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

    Keywords

    • DAMAGE-INDUCED APOPTOSIS
    • NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION-REPAIR
    • CAENORHABDITIS-ELEGANS P53
    • PRIMORDIAL GERM-CELLS
    • TUMOR-SUPPRESSOR P53
    • DNA-DAMAGE
    • C-ELEGANS
    • DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER
    • LIFE-SPAN
    • P53-DEPENDENT APOPTOSIS

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