Plant lignin content altered by soil microbial community

Alison E. Bennett (Lead / Corresponding author), Dominic Grussu, Jason Kam, Sandra Caul, Claire Halpin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Summary
    Questions have been raised in various fields of research about the consequences of plants with modified lignin production. As a result of their roles in nutrient cycling and plant diversity, plant–soil interactions should be a major focus of ecological studies on lignin-modified plants. However, most studies have been decomposition studies conducted in a single soil or in sterile soil. Thus, we understand little about plant–soil interactions in living lignin-modified plants.
    In lignin mutants of three different barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivars and their corresponding wild-types associated with three different soil microbial communities, we asked: do plant–soil microbiome interactions influence the lignin content of plants?; does a mutation in lignin production alter the outcome of plant–soil microbiome interactions?; does the outcome of plant–soil microbiome interactions depend on host genotype or the presence of a mutation altering lignin production?
    In roots, the soil community explained 6% of the variation in lignin content, but, in shoots, the soil community explained 21% of the variation in lignin content and was the only factor influencing lignin content. Neither genotype nor mutations in lignin production explained associations with fungi.
    Lignin content changes in response to a plant's soil microbial community, and may be a defensive response to particular components of the soil community.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)166-174
    Number of pages9
    JournalNew Phytologist
    Volume206
    Issue number1
    Early online date12 Nov 2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

    Fingerprint

    Lignin
    microbial communities
    lignin
    Soil
    soil
    Microbiota
    Hordeum
    mutation
    Mutation
    Genotype
    genotype
    Hordeum vulgare
    biogeochemical cycles
    Fungi
    barley

    Keywords

    • rob1
    • Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi
    • Barley (Hordeum vulgare)
    • Dark septate endophyte lignin
    • Plant defense
    • Soil microbial community

    Cite this

    Bennett, Alison E. ; Grussu, Dominic ; Kam, Jason ; Caul, Sandra ; Halpin, Claire. / Plant lignin content altered by soil microbial community. In: New Phytologist. 2015 ; Vol. 206, No. 1. pp. 166-174.
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    abstract = "Summary Questions have been raised in various fields of research about the consequences of plants with modified lignin production. As a result of their roles in nutrient cycling and plant diversity, plant–soil interactions should be a major focus of ecological studies on lignin-modified plants. However, most studies have been decomposition studies conducted in a single soil or in sterile soil. Thus, we understand little about plant–soil interactions in living lignin-modified plants. In lignin mutants of three different barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivars and their corresponding wild-types associated with three different soil microbial communities, we asked: do plant–soil microbiome interactions influence the lignin content of plants?; does a mutation in lignin production alter the outcome of plant–soil microbiome interactions?; does the outcome of plant–soil microbiome interactions depend on host genotype or the presence of a mutation altering lignin production? In roots, the soil community explained 6{\%} of the variation in lignin content, but, in shoots, the soil community explained 21{\%} of the variation in lignin content and was the only factor influencing lignin content. Neither genotype nor mutations in lignin production explained associations with fungi. Lignin content changes in response to a plant's soil microbial community, and may be a defensive response to particular components of the soil community.",
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    Bennett, AE, Grussu, D, Kam, J, Caul, S & Halpin, C 2015, 'Plant lignin content altered by soil microbial community', New Phytologist, vol. 206, no. 1, pp. 166-174. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.13171

    Plant lignin content altered by soil microbial community. / Bennett, Alison E. (Lead / Corresponding author); Grussu, Dominic; Kam, Jason; Caul, Sandra; Halpin, Claire.

    In: New Phytologist, Vol. 206, No. 1, 04.2015, p. 166-174.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    T1 - Plant lignin content altered by soil microbial community

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    N2 - Summary Questions have been raised in various fields of research about the consequences of plants with modified lignin production. As a result of their roles in nutrient cycling and plant diversity, plant–soil interactions should be a major focus of ecological studies on lignin-modified plants. However, most studies have been decomposition studies conducted in a single soil or in sterile soil. Thus, we understand little about plant–soil interactions in living lignin-modified plants. In lignin mutants of three different barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivars and their corresponding wild-types associated with three different soil microbial communities, we asked: do plant–soil microbiome interactions influence the lignin content of plants?; does a mutation in lignin production alter the outcome of plant–soil microbiome interactions?; does the outcome of plant–soil microbiome interactions depend on host genotype or the presence of a mutation altering lignin production? In roots, the soil community explained 6% of the variation in lignin content, but, in shoots, the soil community explained 21% of the variation in lignin content and was the only factor influencing lignin content. Neither genotype nor mutations in lignin production explained associations with fungi. Lignin content changes in response to a plant's soil microbial community, and may be a defensive response to particular components of the soil community.

    AB - Summary Questions have been raised in various fields of research about the consequences of plants with modified lignin production. As a result of their roles in nutrient cycling and plant diversity, plant–soil interactions should be a major focus of ecological studies on lignin-modified plants. However, most studies have been decomposition studies conducted in a single soil or in sterile soil. Thus, we understand little about plant–soil interactions in living lignin-modified plants. In lignin mutants of three different barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivars and their corresponding wild-types associated with three different soil microbial communities, we asked: do plant–soil microbiome interactions influence the lignin content of plants?; does a mutation in lignin production alter the outcome of plant–soil microbiome interactions?; does the outcome of plant–soil microbiome interactions depend on host genotype or the presence of a mutation altering lignin production? In roots, the soil community explained 6% of the variation in lignin content, but, in shoots, the soil community explained 21% of the variation in lignin content and was the only factor influencing lignin content. Neither genotype nor mutations in lignin production explained associations with fungi. Lignin content changes in response to a plant's soil microbial community, and may be a defensive response to particular components of the soil community.

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