Positive evidence for neonatal imitation: A general response, adaptive engagement

Emese Nagy (Lead / Corresponding author), Karen Pilling, Victoria Blake, Hajnalka Orvos

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Abstract

The study employed four gestural models using frame-by-frame microanalytic methods, and followed how the behaviours unfolded over time. Forty-two human newborns (0–3 days) were examined for their imitation of tongue protrusion, ‘head tilt with looking up’, three-finger and two-finger gestures. The results showed that all three gesture groups were imitated. Results of the temporal analyses revealed an early and a later, second stage of responses. Later responses were characterized by a suppression of similar, but non-matching movements. Perinatal imitation is not a phenomenon served by a single underlying mechanism; it has at least two different stages. An early phase is followed by voluntary matching behaviour by the neonatal infant.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12894
Number of pages16
JournalDevelopmental Science
Early online date13 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2019

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Gestures
Fingers
Infant Behavior
Tongue
Head

Keywords

  • Perinatal imitation
  • neonatal imitation
  • imprinting
  • intersubjectivity
  • behavioural analysis

Cite this

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title = "Positive evidence for neonatal imitation: A general response, adaptive engagement",
abstract = "The study employed four gestural models using frame-by-frame microanalytic methods, and followed how the behaviours unfolded over time. Forty-two human newborns (0–3 days) were examined for their imitation of tongue protrusion, ‘head tilt with looking up’, three-finger and two-finger gestures. The results showed that all three gesture groups were imitated. Results of the temporal analyses revealed an early and a later, second stage of responses. Later responses were characterized by a suppression of similar, but non-matching movements. Perinatal imitation is not a phenomenon served by a single underlying mechanism; it has at least two different stages. An early phase is followed by voluntary matching behaviour by the neonatal infant.",
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Positive evidence for neonatal imitation : A general response, adaptive engagement. / Nagy, Emese (Lead / Corresponding author); Pilling, Karen; Blake, Victoria; Orvos, Hajnalka .

In: Developmental Science, 01.10.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Pilling, Karen

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AU - Orvos, Hajnalka

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