Potential biological removal and other currently used management rules for marine mammal populations: A comparison

Mike Lonergan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    28 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The management of marine mammal populations requires the balancing of conflicting interests and also compliance with national legislation and international agreements. These conflicts are intensifying and it is becoming urgent that management goals, and justifications, are clear and explicit. This paper summarises six methods currently used to assess the status of marine mammal populations: the IUCN Red List Criteria; the regulations under the European Union Habitats Directive; PBR; the IWC's Revised Management Procedure; HELCOM's approach to managing seals; and the Canadian Objective-Based Fisheries Management system for harp seals. It compares the assumptions and implications of the methods then describes how one of them, PBR, can be re-presented to make explicit the subjective choice at its centre, and push the decision about conservation targets back from scientists to policymakers, where it belongs.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)584-589
    Number of pages6
    JournalMarine Policy
    Volume35
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2011

    Keywords

    • Cetacean
    • Conservation management
    • Conservation target
    • Pinniped
    • Population management target

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Aquatic Science
    • General Environmental Science
    • Economics and Econometrics
    • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
    • Law

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