Proceedings of the 39th International Workshop on Water Waves and Floating Bodies

Masoud Hayatdavoodi (Editor), Binbin Zhao (Editor)

Research output: Book/ReportBook

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Abstract

The International Workshop on Water Waves and Floating Bodies (IWWWFB) is an
annual meeting of engineers and scientists with a particular emphasis on water
waves and their effects on floating and fixed marine structures. The Workshop was
initiated by Professor D. V. Evans (University of Bristol) and Professor J. N. Newman
(MIT) following informal meetings between their research groups in 1984. First
intended to promote communication between researchers in the UK and the USA,
the interest and participation quickly spread to include researchers from many other
countries around the world.

The Workshop enhances the basic and applied scientific knowledge on water waves
and their interaction with floating and fixed bodies with various applications and
facilitates the advancement and transfer of knowledge between research groups
across the globe, and between senior and early career researchers. The workshop
proceedings are freely accessible through the dedicated internet address
www.iwwwfb.org where all contributions from 1986 on can be found.

Individual papers from the 2024 conference can be found on the IWWWFB website here: http://www.iwwwfb.org/Workshops/39.htm  
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationUniversity of Dundee
PublisherIWWWFB
Number of pages280
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2024
Event39th International Workshop on Water Waves and Floating Bodies
- Fairmont Hotel, St Andrews , United Kingdom
Duration: 14 Apr 202417 Apr 2024
Conference number: 39th
https://sites.dundee.ac.uk/iwwwfb2024/

Keywords

  • water waves
  • floating structures
  • wave-structure interaction
  • wave loads
  • linear waves
  • nonlinear waves
  • wave diffraction
  • hydroelasticity
  • marine renewable energy
  • naval architecture

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