Promoting changes in diet and physical activity in breast and colorectal cancer screening settings

an unexplored opportunity for endorsing healthy behaviors

Annie S. Anderson (Lead / Corresponding author), Dionne Mackison, Callum Boath, Robert Steele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The importance of diet, physical activity, and weight management in breast and colorectal cancer prevention is widely recognized. While there may be many “teachable moments” that could be used to assess and initiate changes in these behaviors by health professionals (to complement public health campaigns), there is little evidence that lifestyle is discussed within cancer screening settings. The lack of advocacy about lifestyle in these settings may endorse poor health behaviors, in particular the absence of guidance to visibly obese patients. To fully use the teachable moment, patients need to be aware of the relationship between diet and physical activity and the risk of cancer and to be able to relate guidance to personal behaviors. Results from cardiovascular and diabetes prevention programs provide evidence about the components of effective behavior change programs which could be used in the screening setting. Findings from interventions initiated in the colorectal cancer screening setting suggest that such programs can be delivered but it is not clear how acceptable these are in routine health services. Effective interventions delivered in this setting also offer an important opportunity to contribute to the reduction of the overall burden of chronic non-communicable diseases
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-172
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Prevention Research
Volume6
Issue number3
Early online date16 Jan 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Exercise
Breast Neoplasms
Diet
Life Style
Health Behavior
Health Promotion
Health Services
Public Health
Weights and Measures
Health
Neoplasms

Cite this

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abstract = "The importance of diet, physical activity, and weight management in breast and colorectal cancer prevention is widely recognized. While there may be many “teachable moments” that could be used to assess and initiate changes in these behaviors by health professionals (to complement public health campaigns), there is little evidence that lifestyle is discussed within cancer screening settings. The lack of advocacy about lifestyle in these settings may endorse poor health behaviors, in particular the absence of guidance to visibly obese patients. To fully use the teachable moment, patients need to be aware of the relationship between diet and physical activity and the risk of cancer and to be able to relate guidance to personal behaviors. Results from cardiovascular and diabetes prevention programs provide evidence about the components of effective behavior change programs which could be used in the screening setting. Findings from interventions initiated in the colorectal cancer screening setting suggest that such programs can be delivered but it is not clear how acceptable these are in routine health services. Effective interventions delivered in this setting also offer an important opportunity to contribute to the reduction of the overall burden of chronic non-communicable diseases",
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